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Can Dogs Eat Bread?

The short answer: It depends. The long answer: Bread can be fed to your dog as long as it is the plain type and does not contain any of the following: xylitol (an artificial sweetener that is highly toxic for dogs), raisins (dried fruit which causes mood changes, depression, and kidney failure), nuts (macadamia nuts Read More...

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The short answer: It depends.

The long answer: Bread can be fed to your dog as long as it is the plain type and does not contain any of the following: xylitol (an artificial sweetener that is highly toxic for dogs), raisins (dried fruit which causes mood changes, depression, and kidney failure), nuts (macadamia nuts and walnuts are toxic for dogs), and jams or jellies (these dried preserves usually contain high amounts of sugar). 

Some paw-rents give bread to their dogs when their pet is feeling constipated or bloated. Whether whole wheat or grain-based, plain bread is supposed to help sooth these mild upset stomach symptoms because of its high fiber content. 

Others allow their dogs to eat bread after the dog has eaten something sharp or long and string-like. In both cases, the bread can help encase the sharp edges and lump together the string, helping them go through the intestines safely. Small pieces of bread can also be used to conceal medicine that a dog doesn’t want to ingest. 

How to feed bread to your dog: Read the labels and choose the type of bread that does not have ingredients which can cause harm to your dog. If you can bake your own bread, even better! However, never serve him bread before it is baked, because rising bread can cause other complications in his tummy.

Depending on the size of your dog, you can cut up a few pieces and serve it to him toasted, warm, or at room temperature. 

Here are three ideas for shrimp treats your dog will love:

  1. Create bread bites with dollops of xylitol-free peanut butter slathered over it.
  2. Try baking him his very own banana bread.
  3. Make doggie treats by baking slices of bread with cheese until they become crunchy.

In summary: Talk to your veterinarian before introducing bread to your dog’s diet. Though bread is high in fiber, it is best not to give it to your dog on a regular basis because of its high calorie content. 

References:

Food dogs should not eat and some they should

Can Dogs Eat Bread?

Is Bread Helpful for a Dog’s Digestion?

*Feature photo by Kate Remmer on Unsplash

Can Dogs Eat Shrimp?

The short answer: Yes and no. The long answer: Dogs can eat shrimp as long as they’re cooked and served without any oil, fat, or seasoning. Never serve raw shrimp to your dog because these may carry intestinal parasites and/or bacteria such as E.Coli, salmonella, and listeria which may infect your four-legged friend (and may Read More...

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The short answer: Yes and no.

The long answer: Dogs can eat shrimp as long as they’re cooked and served without any oil, fat, or seasoning. Never serve raw shrimp to your dog because these may carry intestinal parasites and/or bacteria such as E.Coli, salmonella, and listeria which may infect your four-legged friend (and may even be transmitted to you!). Symptoms include vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Also, take note that some dogs may be allergic to shrimp. Start out by feeding him one piece and observe his body’s reaction to it.

How to feed shrimp to your dog: Serve it boiled, steamed, baked, or grilled. To prevent choking, always remove the shell and tail before letting your dog eat the freshly cooked shellfish.

Here are three ideas for shrimp treats your dog will love:

  1. Serve it fresh off the grill. Make your dog perform a trick and give it to him as a reward.
  2. Chop a few pieces of shrimp and mix it with your dog’s regular meal.
  3. Cook a small batch of broccoli and shrimp for your pup to enjoy! The contrast of flavors and textures will be a unique experience for him.

In summary: Plump, cooked shrimp can be enjoyed by your pet as a healthy snack! It is an amazing source of protein (provides energy), selenium (prevents cardiovascular disease), and vitamin B12 (increases red blood cell production).

References:
Can Dogs Eat Shrimp?
Can dogs eat shrimp?

Photo by Elle Hughes

Can Dogs Eat Fruits?

The short answer: It depends. The long answer: Your dog can eat an array of fresh fruits that provide vitamins and nutrients to his body, but you may have to limit his intake based on the sugar content of your chosen fruit. When introducing a new fruit to his diet, do it one at a Read More...

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The short answer: It depends.

The long answer: Your dog can eat an array of fresh fruits that provide vitamins and nutrients to his body, but you may have to limit his intake based on the sugar content of your chosen fruit. When introducing a new fruit to his diet, do it one at a time so you can monitor your dog’s reaction to each fruit. 

Some examples of fruits your dog can eat include apples, bananas, blueberries, cantaloupe, honeydew, kiwi, mango, orange, pear, pineapple, raspberries, strawberries, and watermelon. Meanwhile, your dog must never consume avocados, cherries, figs, grapefruit, grapes, lemon, lime, and plums.

How to feed fruits to your dog: Wash your chosen fruit properly, take out the hard outer layer, and remove the seeds. Chop the flesh into smaller, chewable pieces so your dog doesn’t have a hard time eating it. Chopping it will also prevent him from choking on it. Serve it chilled or frozen for a refreshing twist!

Here are three ideas for fruity treats your dog will love:

  1. Give him a bowl of his favourite fresh fruits!
  2. A fruity pupsicle made of choice fruits and plain, non-fat yogurt will be his summer staple.
  3. Blend some fruits and vegetables for a power-packed smoothie served in a bowl.

In summary: Your dog can benefit from having fruits incorporated into his diet, but remember that not all human-consumable fruits can be gobbled up by dogs. Before serving your pooch anything new, clear things with your veterinarian. It’s better to be safe than sorry!

References:

Food dogs should not eat and some they should

10 Best Fruits and Vegetables for Dogs

25 Fruits Dogs Can and Can’t Eat

Can Dogs Eat Peanuts?

The short answer: Yes, but in limited quantities. The long answer: Peanuts are high in fat, making them harder for dogs to process. If your dog eats too many peanuts, it may develop into pancreatitis—a disease that results in painful, inflamed pancreas. How to feed peanuts to your dog: You can give them raw, or Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, but in limited quantities.

The long answer: Peanuts are high in fat, making them harder for dogs to process. If your dog eats too many peanuts, it may develop into pancreatitis—a disease that results in painful, inflamed pancreas.

How to feed peanuts to your dog: You can give them raw, or you can try boiling or roasting them without adding any seasoning. Don’t forget to take the peanuts out of the shell because the fibrous outer covering cannot be digested by your dog. Because of their small size, peanuts may also cause blockage in your dog’s air passage, stomach, and/or intestines. It is best to watch over your dog as he eats it. Some dogs may also be allergic to peanuts, so before feeding your dog a handful, give him a piece first and see how his body reacts to it.

Here are three ideas for peanut treats your dog will love:

  1. Mash your peanuts, mix a bit of olive oil, and serve it as all-natural peanut butter.
  2. Introduce a different flavor to your dog by slightly roasting the peanuts you serve him.
  3. Give your dog a tasty treat of crushed peanuts and chopped celery.

In summary: As long as they’re served raw or cooked without any flavouring (salt, sugar, or any artificial seasoning), peanuts can be a good treat for your dog to have once in a while.

References:
Food dogs should not eat and some they should
Can Dogs Eat Peanuts?

Can Dogs Eat Celery?

The short answer: Yes, but in limited quantities. The long answer: Celery is a low-calorie vegetable that can be fed to your dog as a treat. However, due to the stringy consistency of celery, your dog may end up with stringy feces that’ll be difficult for him to pass. Too much of it may also Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, but in limited quantities.

The long answer: Celery is a low-calorie vegetable that can be fed to your dog as a treat. However, due to the stringy consistency of celery, your dog may end up with stringy feces that’ll be difficult for him to pass. Too much of it may also cause your dog to pee more than usual.

How to feed celery to your dog: Wash the celery properly. Remove the leaves, and cut it into small, chewable pieces to prevent choking.

Here are three ideas for celery treats your dog will love:

  1. Freshen up your dog’s breath by giving it to him as is!  
  2. Come up with homemade dog food made up of celery, carrots, broccoli, and brown rice.
  3. Your dog will love the smell and taste of this hearty chicken casserole which has a stalk of celery in it.

In summary: Low in fat and cholesterol, celery can be given to your dog as an occasional crunchy treat.

References:
Food dogs should not eat and some they should
What Vegetables Can Dogs Eat?

Pet Adoption Tails: Stefanie Gibbons and Kimba

Dog trainer and part-time administrator Stefanie Gibbons didn’t think she’d end up with a pack of Siberian Huskies, but after adopting seven-year-old Kimba from a shelter, she eventually welcomed three other dogs—Ollie, Gamble, and Lyra (ages 5, 7, and 4 respectively)—into her home. This is her amazing pet adoption tail. Waldo’s Friends (WF): How did Read More...

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Dog trainer and part-time administrator Stefanie Gibbons didn’t think she’d end up with a pack of Siberian Huskies, but after adopting seven-year-old Kimba from a shelter, she eventually welcomed three other dogs—Ollie, Gamble, and Lyra (ages 5, 7, and 4 respectively)—into her home. This is her amazing pet adoption tail.

Waldo’s Friends (WF): How did you and Kimba meet?

Stefanie Gibbons (SG): Five years ago, I was volunteering with Alaskan Malamute Rehoming Aid Australia Inc. (AMRAA) at their kennels on the central coast. It was my first day, and my duties were to socialize with the dogs, in pairs or alone. 

It was nearly the end of the day, and I had met about 10 different dogs. I’d noticed a pattern: some dogs were far more interested in checking out the yard I was in, while others followed me to where I would sit, for affection. 

Kimba was an unclaimed stray who had been at the rescue for about two months. She followed me but sat just out of reach. She would stare at me with these big brown eyes, but would only allow contact for a few seconds before leaping away. My first thought was, “Oh boy, you’re weird.” My second thought was, “You’re coming home with me.”
 
We originally thought she was six years old. She was like a nana (grandma) and the fun police whenever other dogs were playing. When I got her home, it became apparent that she was significantly younger than we first thought. She was offering me toys and engaging in really playful puppy behaviour. We checked her chip and discovered she was barely two years old.

The various faces of Kimba

WF: Were there any issues you had to deal with when you took in Kimba?

SG: My first challenge was that I lived in a studio apartment with my 16-year-old cat Saturn, but we made it work. I made the decision early on to keep them separate as I wasn’t confident in how to manage the prey drive, and had a few close friends who loved taking Saturn for purr therapy. 

Kimba quickly toilet trained herself and had zero issues with being left alone when I worked. It became apparent that she had some pretty major anxiety, but a regular routine and training helped her manage that. A week later, I brought in a 10-year-old Rottweiler-Malamute named Dakota (he passed away last January), and she flourished with the doggy company. We struggled with walking because every time Kimba saw another dog, she’d stand on her back legs and make horrid noises in excitement. Fortunately, Dakota was a steady influence on her. With each dog I’ve added to the household, Kimba has become so much more affectionate and confident. She’s learned to lean right in for cuddles and she loves guests. 

Kimba cuddling her daddy Brenton. This took a long time because she struggles with lying still with someone.

WF: Is there a special bonding activity that only you and Kimba do together?

SG: When I first got her, the only affection she would allow was 15 seconds of ear rubs IF she could lick my chin at the same time! Now we’ve progressed to rubbing her neck and she will face plant into my chest or armpit, and melt down into my arms. It’s the cutest thing you’ll ever see!

WF: Aside from this exchange of affection, does Kimba have any funny or interesting quirks?

SG: When she’s sick, she’s the biggest baby ever. The first time she wasn’t feeling well, I had had her for maybe three months. She wouldn’t go for her walk, so I had to carry her home. She stood and stared at me until I cuddled her. She spent the whole day asleep on my chest in a hammock. 
 
The next time she got sick, she woke me up at 2 am by puking on my head. After I showered and changed the bedding, I had to spoon her all night. Normally, she would sleep totally separate from anyone else and if you woke her, she’d have a lot to say about it.

WF: Why would you personally encourage adopting animals?

SG: Watching Kimba go from a nervous and shy dog to a total queen of the house has been very rewarding. She is so ridiculously affectionate in ways I never thought she would be. It’s also been wonderful to watch her learn from every dog we’ve brought in, either guests or permanent siblings.

WF: Let’s talk about your other dogs. Did you get them partially for Kimba’s sake?

SG: I actually got Ollie as a companion for Kimba. Her energy level outmatched Dakota’s, and Ollie was the first dog she actually played well with. I’d actually seen his photo on our rescue Facebook, with the big scar across his muzzle and my heart just melted. 

A few weeks later, I boarded Kimba and Dakota while I visited family in Perth. The now president of the rescue sent me a video of them playing. Kimba’s play style is rough, but she’s a princess when it comes to returns. Ollie took all of her hits and came back for more. He was this skinny little possum, we called him. He looked like a stretched brushtail possum. When I first met him, he ran to me when I called his name and collapsed at my feet. 
 
Ollie was recovering from malnutrition after being badly neglected and abused, so sometimes his legs would just stop working as he ran and he’d face plant. But he’d get right up again. That first day I went into his kennel, he scrambled awkwardly into my lap as I bent down. I had my hand on his chest and realised his pulse was slowing. He’d just fallen asleep in my arms immediately. 
 
He was and is Kimba’s perfect foil. He is such a gentle boy, but he loves to play. He will adjust how he plays to his partner. He can play a non-scary chase game with a little fluffy, never towering over them or cornering them, or he can play gladiators with another husky. He will be the fun uncle to any puppy—if they squeak, he lets them initiate the next round. 
 
Gamble and Lyra were kind of accidental babies. They came into the house “just for one night” and that became “just another week until she’s got more weight or I train her to do this.” Eventually, my husband would end up falling in love with them and how much they bonded to me and let them stay!

Ollie, Gamble, and Lyra

WF: What’s it like having so many dogs at home? Did you have to undergo any major changes to accommodate all of them?

SG: Once I got Ollie, I knew that studio life was not gonna work! I arranged to move into a family property. About this time, my relationship with my now husband meant that he would move in with me. We eventually moved into a large house (with four bedrooms, so several housemates) with a good sized courtyard. At one point we had five permanent dogs, one husky coming for daily day care, and several puppies! 
 
My dogs, especially Kimba, benefitted from having other people and dogs in the house. It definitely socialised them all to different-sized dogs, and the puppies that I raised are totally bombproof. One dachshund is fairly sure he’s a husky! 
 
Eventually, we moved and we knew a big yard wasn’t a priority. The most important thing was a couch that could fit five to six dogs and two people! My dogs prefer park jaunts over any yard because they like the chance to meet people and dogs.

Lyra and Kimba out and about; Siberian flat tire

WF: How has your life changed after adopting Kimba and your other pets?

SG: I changed my whole life to better accommodate Kimba. I started dog walking full time, I researched dog training, and now I’m on my way to being an accredited dog trainer.

WF: What’s your advice for people thinking of adopting a rescue? And what advice can you give for first-time animal owners?

SG: Be patient and mindful of what’s happening from their perspective. Everything around them is changing and they don’t know what to expect or what to do. Guide them with love and patience to the right choices (like where to potty) and reward them heavily. Building a trust bond with them will take time, but it’s not hard and it’s immediately rewarding.

For first-time dog owners, think about the life you can offer a dog, not what kind of dog suits you because you can change your life far more easily than a dog can.

The destruction planning committee

See what Stefanie and her delightful pets are up to by following her on Instagram.

Do you know of an interesting pet adoption story? Share your suggestion with us by commenting below!

Can Dogs Eat Eggs?

The short answer: Yes and no. The long answer: Dogs can eat cooked eggs for some excellent protein fix. Eggs are even known to help settle nervous, queasy stomachs. However, raw eggs contain avidin and conalbumin, which can lead to skin or hair coat problems or introduce deadly bacteria when consumed (and there’s always the Read More...

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The short answer: Yes and no.

The long answer: Dogs can eat cooked eggs for some excellent protein fix. Eggs are even known to help settle nervous, queasy stomachs. However, raw eggs contain avidin and conalbumin, which can lead to skin or hair coat problems or introduce deadly bacteria when consumed (and there’s always the issue of salmonella).

How to feed eggs to your dog: Cook, boil, or bake eggs as is, or combine them with other dog-friendly ingredients. Never prepare the eggs with salt, oil, or butter. Remove the hard shell and chop it into smaller pieces to prevent choking in smaller animals.

Here are three ideas for egg-laden treats your dog will love:

  1. Brekkie is served in the form of eggs, veggies, and rice in a bowl!
  2. Two whole eggs are mixed into these delightful pumpkin dog biscuits.
  3. Try serving your dog with omelette filled with cheese.

In summary: High in protein, iron, amino acids, and fatty acids, eggs that are cooked or boiled without artificial flavourings can be a part of a dog’s daily diet.

References:
Food dogs should not eat and some they should
Can dogs eat eggs?

*Feature photo by Caroline Attwood on Unsplash

Can Dogs Eat Oranges?

The short answer: Yes. The long answer: Your dog will benefit from eating oranges because of the high vitamin C content that’s great for his immune system. Be sure to offer your little pooch oranges in moderation (keep that sugar intake in check!) and without the seeds or rind. How to feed oranges to your Read More...

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The short answer: Yes.

The long answer: Your dog will benefit from eating oranges because of the high vitamin C content that’s great for his immune system. Be sure to offer your little pooch oranges in moderation (keep that sugar intake in check!) and without the seeds or rind.

How to feed oranges to your dog: Peel off the rind and dispose carefully. Even though the rind has concentrated levels of vitamin C, it will be difficult for your pooch to digest. Before feeding your dog, pick out the seeds to prevent choking. A small dog should only be fed one or two segments of a medium-sized orange, while a bigger dog can eat half of the fruit. However, refrain from feeding oranges to a diabetic dog to prevent increase in blood sugar levels.

Here are three ideas for orange treats your dog will love:

  1. A delicious tray of orange and cranberry biscuits will make his tail wag. 
  2. Freshen your pooch’s breath by feeding him a combination of orange and mint juice.
  3. Give your dog a sweet, citrus blast by treating him to a few pieces of sliced oranges and pineapples.

In summary: The flesh and pith of oranges will enhance your dog’s taste buds and introduce him to the wonders of citrus eats. When eaten in appropriate quantities, it can provide your dog’s body with potassium, thiamine, folate, and vitamin C.

References:
Can dogs eat oranges?
Can dogs eat grapes or oranges?

*Feature photo by Stephanie Harvey on Unsplash

Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes?

The short answer: Yes and no. The long answer: Ripe and unprocessed tomatoes can be eaten by your dog, but he shouldn’t be fed the leaves, stems, or raw fruit because of a toxin called solanine. If high amounts of this toxin is ingested, it can result in gastrointestinal upset, increased heart rate, and/or loss Read More...

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The short answer: Yes and no.

The long answer: Ripe and unprocessed tomatoes can be eaten by your dog, but he shouldn’t be fed the leaves, stems, or raw fruit because of a toxin called solanine. If high amounts of this toxin is ingested, it can result in gastrointestinal upset, increased heart rate, and/or loss of coordination.

How to feed tomatoes to your dog: Check to see if your tomatoes are ripe, and wash them thoroughly before slicing them. Remove the stems and leaves and dispose of them properly. Instead of raw tomatoes, give your dog cooked tomato chunks since this changes the vegetable’s properties. Tomatoes are known to be a common ingredient in some commercially sold dog food. However, keep in mind that you shouldn’t feed your dog cooked tomatoes mixed with any sauces, oils, or herbs.

Here are three ideas for tomato treats your dog will love:

  1. Place melted cheese over ripe tomatoes and serve them warm for that extra gooey factor!
  2. Bake energy-packed wheat and tomato biscuits for your good boy.
  3. Add freshly pureed ripe tomatoes to your dog’s meaty meal.

In summary: Vitamin C, vitamin K, potassium, folate, and lycopene are just some of the nutrients your dog can get from occasionally snacking on ripe tomatoes.

References:
Food dogs should not eat and some they should
Can dogs eat tomatoes? Are tomatoes safe for dogs?

*Feature photo by Alex Ghizila on Unsplash

Can Dogs Eat Watermelon?

The short answer: Yes. The long answer: More than just being a refreshing summer treat, watermelon contains antioxidants and nutrients that help destroy free radicals found in your dog’s body. Compared to any other fruit or vegetable, it has the highest amount of lycopene which helps against cell damage. How to feed watermelon to your Read More...

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The short answer: Yes.

The long answer: More than just being a refreshing summer treat, watermelon contains antioxidants and nutrients that help destroy free radicals found in your dog’s body. Compared to any other fruit or vegetable, it has the highest amount of lycopene which helps against cell damage.

How to feed watermelon to your dog: Cut the watermelon into smaller sections. Take out the seeds and its rind. The watermelon seeds can cause intestinal blockage while the watermelon rind may upset your dog’s stomach. Serve your dog limited amounts of watermelon since overfeeding him may cause diarrhea.

Here are three ideas for watermelon treats your dog will love:

  1. Blend watermelon cubes with coconut water then freeze the juice in an ice tray.
  2. Pureed watermelon and yogurt go well together! Refrigerate for a few hours, and serve it in a bowl for a treat that will cool him down.
  3. Make use of the season’s harvest! Combine diced watermelon with diced strawberries for a fruity twist.
  4. Or simply chill some watermelon sections to offer your puppy a refreshing hot day treat!

In summary: Filled with lycopene, vitamin A, and potassium, watermelon can give your dog the sufficient amount of nutrients he needs while also keeping him hydrated.

References:
Food dogs should not eat and some they should
Can dogs eat watermelon?
10 Best Fruits and Vegetables for Dogs

*Feature photo by Juja Han on Unsplash

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