Category: Animal shelters

Amazing Acts: Ninja’s Rescued Kittens

Since 2017, Lady Logarta has been single-handedly running her independent rescue in Manila, Philippines called Ninja’s Rescued Kittens. As a child, she was already feeding stray cats, bringing home abandoned kittens, and caring for them with the help of her parents who were bonafide animal lovers. Lady shares what inspired her to set up Ninja’s Read More...

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Lady with some of the cats she has rescued

Since 2017, Lady Logarta has been single-handedly running her independent rescue in Manila, Philippines called Ninja’s Rescued Kittens. As a child, she was already feeding stray cats, bringing home abandoned kittens, and caring for them with the help of her parents who were bonafide animal lovers. Lady shares what inspired her to set up Ninja’s Rescued Kittens from her own home. 

Waldo’s Friends (WF): How did your rescue officially start? 

Lady Logarta (LL): In June 16, 2017, I rescued a newborn kitten that was almost drowning in a ditch. I researched all I could from the Internet to help her survive. After saving her, I realized that I could sacrifice sleep to save others like her, so I focused my advocacy on saving orphaned and abandoned kittens. At first, I shouldered all the expenses. But eventually, I made a Facebook page so that I could ask for donations to help me care for them and continue feeding stray cats in my area too.

I thought of naming the rescue after my nickname, Ninja. As an independent rescuer, I am not affiliated with big organisations or groups. What I aim to do is inspire people to help cats, especially kittens as they are most vulnerable.

WF: What would you say is the best thing about running your own rescue?

LL: I like the peace and quiet. There’s absolutely no drama. I need to be in a good mental state to focus on each cat or kitten. 

The foster cats striking a paws

WF: How old was the youngest kitten you ever took in? What was the experience like caring for these helpless kittens?

LL: I once took care of a newly born kitten with the umbilical cord still attached to him. Young kittens need to be fed every two hours. They must be kept warm and had to be stimulated to pee and poop. This takes a few weeks of very little sleep, but worth it to give them a chance at life.

Keeping a close eye on kittens is what I live for

WF: In your official Instagram account, you mentioned caring for more than 60 cats on your own. Could you share what happens with them on a daily basis? 

LL: I feed the adults wet food twice a day, the bigger kittens thrice a day, and the little ones as often as possible. I leave a bowl of dry food for them to nibble on. In between, I do the cleaning/laundry, buy cat food, and go to vet appointments. If possible, I spend an hour twice each day to play with them. At night, I go out to feed the stray cats. 

Happily hanging out in one big space

WF: How long do the kittens usually stay with you? 

LL: I usually put them up for adoption when they’re four months old onwards. I make sure I spay/neuter before I release them. Before, when I didn’t have enough funds, I would have an agreement with the adopters to shoulder the vaccination. 

WF: What are your prerequisites when allowing someone to adopt your rescue cat?

LL: I have a strict screening process that allows me to find the best adopters. I ask them why they want to adopt a cat, their current situation at home, their lifestyle, and more. I also make sure they agree to update me every month about the cat’s condition. 

WF: As a rescue that has been up and running for two years, what’s the nicest feedback you’ve gotten about the kittens and your rescue?

LL: Adopters say that they are the sweetest cats they’ve ever had. These cats love kisses and hugs. They love attention and are very friendly. 

I’ve also received several messages from people who told me that they saved abandoned kittens because they were inspired by what I do. It is very heartwarming and sometimes gives me happy tears.

How can you resist this face?

WF: What’s the most challenging thing about running a rescue on your own?

LL: I literally do everything. I care for the newborn babies, clean, mop, vacuum, wash bowls, do laundry, feed cats, give medicine, buy cat food and supplies, accompany them to vet appointments, scoop litter boxes every two to three hours, and more. With all these daily tasks, I think I honestly need more time.

WF: Have you ever permanently adopted any of the cats you’ve rescued? How do they feel about having many foster siblings?

LL: Yes, I’ve adopted my first two rescues, Ponyo and Clowie. Ponyo was the first newborn kitten I saved, while Clowie was a month old when I took her in. Her would-be adopter changed her mind so I decided to keep her. They both get along with the other cats.

Ponyo, the tiny newborn I rescued from the ditch

WF: What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about stray cats and the animal rescue industry? How do you address those fallacies?

LL: Here in the Philippines, they think cats have more rabies than dogs, so I try to inform people that this isn’t true. Also, some people think that cats are unfriendly. I tell them that they are the sweetest creatures, just more independent compared to dogs. They also need to be taken care of differently (i.e. they need litter boxes).

WF: How can people support your cause? 

LL: People can donate to us for cat food and supplies as well as help us raise funds to build an additional room for the cats.

WF: What is your advice to other people who want to create their own rescue or are thinking about rescuing animals?

LL: Life is too short not to do good things. Do it for love so the impossible becomes possible. It is not hard when you know what you have to sacrifice to save animals’ lives.

Follow Ninja’s Rescued Kittens on Facebook and Instagram.

Do you know of any independent rescue shelters worth featuring in your neighbourhood? Share your suggestions with us by commenting below!

Amazing Acts: Kotawafa Animal Rescue

For the past 17 years, Neet Hada has been helping stray animals—dogs, cats, donkeys, horses, goats, and birds—in Rajasthan, a state located in the northwestern part of India. He created the Kotawafa Animal Rescue all on his own in 2001, which stands for Kota (the city he is based in) and WAFA (an acronym for Read More...

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Neet and Bravo

For the past 17 years, Neet Hada has been helping stray animals—dogs, cats, donkeys, horses, goats, and birds—in Rajasthan, a state located in the northwestern part of India. He created the Kotawafa Animal Rescue all on his own in 2001, which stands for Kota (the city he is based in) and WAFA (an acronym for We Are For Animals). The independent rescue aims to help animals in need, encourage animal adoptions, and teach people how to create better relationships with their pets. With a focus on roadside treatment and feeding of strays, Kotawafa Animal Rescue hopes to show neglected and abandoned animals that there are people who care. 

Waldo’s Friends (WF): Hi Neet! Could you share a brief history on how the rescue came about?

Neet Hada (NH): Almost 18 years ago, I saw a dog sitting near a shop. He was looking at everyone as if he was hungry. I decided to give him a biscuit, and I saw how his eyes lit up. He came to me with love in his eyes. That was a life-changing moment for me. Since that fateful day, I haven’t stopped helping animals. I have been running Kotawafa on my own over the last 17 years, but now, I have 22 members involved with it.

WF: What’s a regular day like for you when you do work for Kotawafa Animal Rescue?

NH: I am always with my team, mostly doing rescues. I try to teach them how to handle different types of rescue cases so that they can go on their own without me.

WF: What would you say has been the rescue’s most effective campaign over the years?

NH: The most effective campaign I’ve organised is “Cruelty Case Bravo” which helped a stray dog named Bravo. He was beat up badly, got dragged from a vehicle, and ended up with one eye that was severely damaged. When I received the call, my team and I just went there to try and save him. His condition was critical, but the vet did his best to save him. After a few months, he slowly recovered. His eye was successfully closed through an operation. He came to the shelter where we regularly fed him and gave him his prescription.

Bravo’s sad state when we first rescued him

We posted his story on social media, and one non-government organisation in Canada showed interest in adopting him. But the challenge was to make sure he was fit enough to travel—we had to monitor his health and produce a medical fitness certificate. In the next few months, his blood reports came back all good, so I drove Bravo to Delhi by car. After having his last round of check-ups, he got the go signal to fly to Canada! He is now enjoying his new life with love, care, and happiness. I really miss him, but I’m happy for him.

All set to travel to Delhi; now living his best life in Canada

WF: Are there any funny anecdotes you can share involving the rescue?

NH: Funny things rarely happen in this type of job, but once, I got a call from a lady about a German Shepherd. She said that it was lying on the side of the road, not moving at all. She was worried that something bad had happened to him. 

I went there to check up on the dog and found his owner standing right beside him. He told me that his dog is very lazy. Once the dog falls asleep, there’s no way you could wake him up even if you shout at him or try to move him.

WF: What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about the animal rescue industry? How do you and Kotawafa Animal Rescue address those fallacies?

NH: People think that animal rescue is just a waste of time. For them, animals don’t deserve to exist. These people just leave animals to die or suffer. Worse, they hit them. What they don’t understand is that God made these beautiful creatures. They are man’s best friend who are there to protect us without any profit. Some even serve us loyally.

Eighty percent of the times I rescue, I face these types of people. I try to talk to them and try to make them understand that animals are totally dependent on humans. What they need is love, care, and food, but they demand nothing from anyone. 

Making sure the dogs are provided for through adequate food, shelter, and medical care

WF: What’s the best and worst thing about running an animal rescue?

NH: The best thing is the immense satisfaction I get knowing that I am doing what God sent me to do. The worst thing is trying to end animal cruelty and having sufficient funds, food, and treatment to help these animals.

WF: What is your advice for other volunteers involved in animal rescue?

NH: I’d tell them to join only those people who truly love animals. Be ready to rescue 24/7, help animals whenever and wherever needed, and do what is best for them.

WF: What is your advice for people interested in getting into animal rescue like you?

NH: Do it from the heart, with precautions and following the proper way. This is a duty that won’t give you money or rewards, but at the end of the day, you save someone’s life.

A place where the animals happily stay before they find their furever homes

Follow Kotawafa Animal Rescue on Facebook and Instagram or email them for inquiries. 

Do you know of any independent rescue shelters worth featuring in your neighbourhood? Share your suggestions with us by commenting below!

Amazing Acts: It Started with Sam

The founding members of It Started with Sam began as a grassroots rescue group that focused on the plight of abused and abandoned strays in the Philippines. Since their first rescue in 2013, they have rescued hundreds of abandoned dogs and cats, nursed them back to health, and found them loving homes. Waldo’s Friends (WF): Read More...

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The founding members of It Started with Sam began as a grassroots rescue group that focused on the plight of abused and abandoned strays in the Philippines. Since their first rescue in 2013, they have rescued hundreds of abandoned dogs and cats, nursed them back to health, and found them loving homes.

Waldo’s Friends (WF): Could you share a brief history on how the rescue came about?

Marissa Alejandro Lopa (MAL): We started the rescue in 2017 as three friends (me, Maxine Maramba, and Michiko Dulay) who were very concerned with the growing problem of unwanted and/or abused stray animals in the Philippines. Sam, a sick German Shepherd left by its owner to die, was our first foray into rescuing back in 2013. We nursed her back to health.

Say hello to Sam, the dog that inspired our rescue

WF: What does your animal rescue group hope to achieve?

MAL: Our goal is to help as many animals as we can that are in need. We feel that even if we started small, it was a step toward a greater good. We also want to raise awareness among pet owners and people that having pets is a great responsibility.

WF: What is your personal involvement in the rescue?

MAL: If we come across animals that need help, we try our best to rescue them, raise funds for their medical needs, foster them, and find loving homes for them.

WF: What has been the rescue’s most effective campaigns?

MAL: One of our proudest moments was an abandoned dog, Max, who was tied up and left out in the open. He was covered in algae and starving. We drove out to pick him up and got him medical help. We discovered that he is a Husky. He is still with us to this day, and now very healthy. He is so loving and seems grateful that he was found.

Before and after pics of Max

WF: What’s the best thing about running or being part of It Started with Sam?

MAL: It gives us great satisfaction to be able to do something to help lives.

WF: What’s the most challenging thing about running or being part of an animal rescue?

MAL: When we receive a call for help and we have no means to do so. But because we have widened our network, we find it less of a problem these days. The biggest challenge we have is to get Philippine laws passed and enforced to fight cruelty against animals, and also trying to get local government to work with us.

Volunteers bonding with the ISWS rescues

WF: What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about the animal rescue industry? How does your rescue address those fallacies?

MAL: Many think that animals, especially cats, don’t deserve to be rescued. And many think to help is to shell out big amounts of money. While we do need money, we also appreciate other efforts like information dissemination, and looking for fosters or homes. ACTION is the best way to help and not just sympathy.

WF: What is your advice for other rescue owners?

MAL: To never tire of doing what they do and caring.

WF: What is your advice for people interested in getting into animal rescue?

MAL: You can start small by getting in touch with other groups.

WF: How can regular people support your rescue?

MAL: Right now, we are helping develop new no-kill shelters like Pawssion Project’s Malou Perez. Building materials like cement, roofing materials, dog and cat food, and monetary donations are always welcome! Interested parties can contact It Started with Sam through our official Instagram account.

Transforming an old building into a rescue
The animals that currently make use of the transformed space

Is there an animal shelter in your community that’s worth featuring? Share your suggestions with us by commenting below!

Amazing Acts: Pawssion Project

Pawssion Project is a relatively new rescue shelter found in Victorias City, Negros Occidental, Philippines. The non-profit organisation started last October 11, 2018 after its founder, Malou Perez, came across a Facebook post about 50 unwanted dogs who were scheduled to be put to death by gunshot at the local pound. The post compelled her Read More...

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Malou with some of the rescue dogs

Pawssion Project is a relatively new rescue shelter found in Victorias City, Negros Occidental, Philippines. The non-profit organisation started last October 11, 2018 after its founder, Malou Perez, came across a Facebook post about 50 unwanted dogs who were scheduled to be put to death by gunshot at the local pound. The post compelled her to save the lives of those canines, and eventually create a safe haven for them and many more rescue animals. This is her inspiring story.

Waldo’s Friends (WF): Could you share how Pawssion Project came about?

Malou Perez (MP): I’ve always felt that how we treat our animals is indicative of how evolved we are as human beings. Pawssion Project is a humble non-profit organisation that I started with the goal of helping and rescuing stray and impounded dogs, who all scheduled to be killed by gunshot, if left unadopted or unclaimed at the Bacolod City pound three days after being caught.
 
Pawssion Project started last October 2018, when I saw a Facebook post about some 50 dogs who were all scheduled to be killed. My business partner, who owns the four-hectare farm where the shelter is right now, offered two hectares for the rescue animals. We were initially supposed to use it for Airbnb purposes, but in the end, we both thought the animals’ lives were far more important than the business.

WF: What does your animal rescue hope to achieve?

MP: It’s really to create a kinder environment for the animals through population control so they are provided with quality life. We also hope to educate pet owners on their responsibilities, and educate the masses that it’s never okay to hurt animals.

The official logo is made up of a paw that’s represented by a dog house and the trees at the shelter

WF: What is your involvement in the rescue?

MP: I personally manage the social media pages (but I get help from a volunteer with our Facebook inbox), manage shelter operations, take care of the rescue operations, and do fostering too!

Malou personally checks in on the animals at the shelter

WF: What would you say has been Pawssion Project’s most effective campaign?

MP: By far, we have a number of dogs that have been adopted from the shelter since we started last October, so the campaign for dog adoption has been effective. Prior to Pawssion Project, dog adoption has never been top of mind for most people here in Bacolod. Another thing worth mentioning is that there has been zero cases of dogs killed at the pound since we started.

WF: What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about the animal rescue industry? How does your rescue address those fallacies?

MP: I think one is people attacking animal rescuers about the lack of concern for humans. I hate the argument, “Why help dogs when there are a lot of kids and poor people without homes and food to eat?” This is basically why this is an advocacy. Just because people in the animal welfare world focus on animals, it does not mean that we care less about humans. The efforts to vaccinate and sterilise dogs are something that will benefit both animals and humans, because in the end, healthy animals equates to a healthy environment. And at the end of the day, to each his own.

WF: Where do you draw inspiration for your rescue?

MP: My main inspiration for having put up the shelter is Territorio De Zaguates, the land of the strays in Costa Rica. They have over 1,000 rescues and they don’t stop. In terms of standards, it’s SOI Dog Foundation in Thailand. Any dog documentary like Dogs and Life in the Doghouse on Netflix are also just as inspiring.

WF: What’s the best thing about running an animal rescue?

MP: It expands your heart and your capacity to love and care for those who need help the most in ways you can never imagine. Until now, I still feel emotional every time I look at the rescue animals at the shelter. I always think, “They all should have been dead now. But hey, look at them, running around and just living like normal dogs at the shelter.”

The rescue dogs are free to roam around the open space

WF: On the flip side, what would you say is the most challenging thing about running it?

MP: I have thought to myself, this advocacy is the toughest, most draining thing I have ever done in my life. It’s physically draining. I can’t remember the last time I had eight full hours of sleep. I can’t remember the last time I had three complete and on-time meals in one day. 

It’s also emotionally draining. Imagine losing dogs from cases you accommodate daily, wherein most of them have been reported to you when it’s just too late already. Even if I haven’t personally met all the dogs, I still feel involved and attached. Every single case affects me emotionally. I remember getting two days of rest since I started the shelter, and I felt like going into depression because the horrible images, videos, and cries of the dogs in the pounds would haunt me as I slept. 

And of course, it’s financially draining. Most often, donations don’t even form half of rescue operations, shelter operating expenses, and vet bills, which is why I also make it a point to make time for my job and my business. I also have an online job on the side to help sustain the expenses.

WF: What is your advice for other rescue owners like you?

MP: KEEP THE FAITH. This is a mission and a calling. If it’s not for you, you won’t survive this advocacy. And whenever you are on the verge of giving up, think of all the dogs you have helped and all the lives you have preserved. Should you give up, what will happen to them? There aren’t too many committed animal rescuers, so let’s not let the boat sink. Nothing is impossible if we work and pray together.

After a pound rescue operation with volunteers and Pawssion Project’s resident vet, Dr. Froilan

WF: What advice can you give for people interested in getting into animal rescue?

MP: This is a tough niche you’re getting into. We are talking about the lives of voiceless animals. Animals who can never admit themselves when they’re sick or buy food when they’re hungry. But these animals can be the most amazing, loving, and grateful creatures you’ll ever meet when you dedicate your time, talents, skills, and love to them. It’s tiring and exhausting, but nothing can be more fulfilling. In the end, that’s our prime purpose here on earth anyway.

WF: How can regular people support Pawssion Project?

MP: They can adopt, foster, donate, advocate, and volunteer at the shelter which can be found inside Hacienda Cosculluela, Victorias City (a 45-minute drive from Bacolod City) or at our one-month-old shelter in Paradise Farm (San Francisco, Del Monte, Bulacan). The newer shelter has around 80 rescues and 40 for pick up. They can also stay up-to-date by following us on Facebook and Instagram.

Volunteers are always welcome

Is there an animal shelter in your community that’s worth featuring? Share your suggestions with us by commenting below!

Amazing Acts: Paw Pals Animal Rescue

Established in 2007, Paw Pals Animal Rescue (PPAR) is a non-profit organisation that focuses on rescuing cats in Shanghai, China, providing them with shelter, love, and medical care while finding their forever homes. Waldo’s Friends chatted with Alejandra Vasquez Delama, a senior volunteer who spends most of her time spreading the word about the cause Read More...

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Alejandra and a rescue kitten

Established in 2007, Paw Pals Animal Rescue (PPAR) is a non-profit organisation that focuses on rescuing cats in Shanghai, China, providing them with shelter, love, and medical care while finding their forever homes. Waldo’s Friends chatted with Alejandra Vasquez Delama, a senior volunteer who spends most of her time spreading the word about the cause and saving cats.

Waldo’s Friends (WF): Could you share a brief history on how the rescue came about?

Alejandra Vasquez Delama (AVD): Paw Pals Animal Rescue (PPAR) was founded in 2007 by a group of individual animal rescuers that did not have safe or enough space to keep their rescue cats while they looked for good people to adopt them. The creation of the PPAR shelter allowed these rescuers to help even more animals in need, and has since led to permanent efforts to keep and expand the space, and provide comfort and tranquility for all rescued cats and kittens.

Our members also rescue other animals (dogs, hamsters, more), but the PPAR shelter is only for cats as they can be more discreet, require no large gardens, and can be easier to handle compared to a dog shelter. Dog barking can be a serious issue with neighbors in China.

WF: What does PPAR hope to achieve?

AVD: Our main objective is to help homeless cats in the Shanghai area, providing a mid-way home for them until they are placed in responsible, loving homes. As we already on our 12th year, we hope not only to help animals, but to reach into the local and international community in order to help build a positive human-animal bond and to spread the word on several issues (stray animal rescue procedure, vaccinations, responsible ownership, the devastating effects of animal mills, etc).

WF: How long have you been with PPAR and how are you personally involved in it?

AVD: I’ve been with PPAR for eight years. I am in charge of doing several posts about the “PPAR Adoptable Cat of the Month” across several websites every month. I am also the volunteer who pushed for the creation of the PPAR website, found the volunteers needed to build it, and the person who regularly works on uploading new news, posts, and pictures on the site.
 
In terms of events, I am the PPAR liaison with Community Center Shanghai and the Commune Market as PPAR is regularly invited to participate in their events. Other PPAR volunteers and I go there to represent our group and to sell our goods (100% of the proceeds go to the shelter). Regarding magazines and news websites in English and Spanish, I am also the person who is usually interviewed in connection to the activities of PPAR. Of course, besides all the activities that I just mentioned, I rescue animals on a regular basis. I have rescued mostly cats, but also I have experience rescuing dogs and other animals.

WF: What would you say has been the rescue’s most effective campaigns?

AVD: I personally believe our most effective campaign has been to develop a sustainable cat shelter (compared to other animal shelters that have poor facilities, but rely heavily on donations from sponsors to keep running). Our shelter has no sponsors, so all the funds to run it come from individual rescuers that pay a basic amount to board their rescue cats at the shelter, and from senior members of PPAR. This model of shelter management and funding has proved to be quite successful for us and allows us to provide a good mid-way home to our rescued animals.
 
We have been trying to attend to not only the day-to-day issues inside the shelter, but also to participate in more public events (sometimes as co-organizers, other times as invitees). This way, we are able to reach and interact with the general public in a face-to-face way, and get our animal-loving message out there. By these means, we have gained a steady number of new followers and volunteers who bring new energy and ideas to our group.

PPAR volunteers at various events

WF: What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about the animal rescue industry? And how does PPAR address them?

AVD: There are several misconceptions about animal rescue that apply specifically to China:
a) To assume that animal rescue groups in China are similar to the ones in USA, Europe, or other developed countries who have large shelter facilities, vehicles, and financial resources.
b) To assume that all animal rescuers and animal rescue groups are registered (hold a non-profit organisation license) and are managed by honest people.
c) To assume that you can call the police when you are witnessing an animal cruelty/abuse situation. There is no law against animal cruelty in China.
d) To assume that when you want to adopt an animal you can just “take the pet and go” without any screening or that “it is okay” to leave your “unwanted pets” in the “dog pound.”
e) To assume that all veterinary hospitals have the wellbeing of animals as their priority.
 
In PPAR, we try to provide sound advice when people contact us for help. We notice that those people believe some procedures and ideas that do not apply in China. Luckily, most people understand our message and follow our advice.

WF: Are there websites that you regularly visit to draw inspiration for rescue projects?

AVD: The websites I visit regularly are American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), Humane Society International, and Vet Info. I like these websites because each one of them works to: promote human empathy toward animals; protect street animals; support farm animal welfare; stop animal abuse; eliminate painful animal testing; confront cruelty to animals in all forms; and provide very useful information to rescuers, animal owners, foster parents, and staff that manages and maintains the animal shelters. In particular, the ASPCA website provides great tips on marketing campaigns to increase adoptions and organises regular webinars on shelter management, cleaning procedures to minimize risk of diseases, etc.

WF: What’s the best thing about running or being part of an animal rescue?

AVD: There are several good things about being part of a non-profit animal rescue group. First, you get to meet people from different countries who share their love and care for animals, and you can learn from their experiences in order to improve what you do in your own country. Second, you know that you are not alone when you face a very difficult rescue case and you can count on other people for help and/or advice. Personally, I have learned a lot from fellow rescuers, both Chinese and foreigners.

WF: What’s the most challenging thing about being part of an animal rescue group?

AVD: I think one of the most challenging aspects about being a rescuer or running an animal rescue group is the emotional toll that you experience as a result of all the difficulties you face. Sadly in China, there is no law against animal cruelty, animal abandonment, puppy mills, and hoarding, so you sometimes have to face very difficult situations where you cannot call the police to get help, and must rely on your own physical and emotional strength to solve terrible situations. If the situations are impossible, you must deal with the frustration and pain for the animals that you were not able to save.
 
An additional point of difficulty are the irresponsible rescuers, pet owners, pet adopters, and foster parents, who can give you plenty of problems and yet judge you very harshly when you tell them all the wrong things they do and what they need to do to right their wrongs.

WF: Do you have any memorable stories about rescuing cats?

AVD: I have a few anecdotes about the emergency rescues that I have done for the past 10 years, but one in particular comes to mind.
 
For the past few years, I have been living in an apartment building that is located close to a creek. One day, I was going back home from work. When I was walking near the creek and towards my building, I noticed several people looking into the river. It turns out that one cat was barely above the water level, standing on a very thin ledge of the concrete wall. 

The creek and concrete wall where I rescued the cat

The people watching did not know what to do. I went to my apartment and brought a large blanket, thinking to hang it from the edge of the wall all the way down so that the cat could climb up in it. However, the cat was too tired to even try to go up. Consequently, I decided to jump into the river and take the cat out myself, but I had to take my shoes and some clothes off first. I went into the river with just my shirt and underwear. 

The bad news was that the bottom of the river was very muddy, so I sunk in mud until my knees. It was very hard to move or swim. The good news was that the cat did not scratch or bite me when I held him in my arms. I guess he knew I was trying to help him. The locals watching the situation unfold helped me and the cat get out of the river. It would have been impossible to get out of it without help as the concrete walls were too high and I was sinking in mud. After all the ordeal, the rescued kitty had a happy ending and I had a funny story to tell.

WF: What’s your advice for people interested in getting into animal rescue?

AVD: The most important advice that I can give to people interested in getting into animal rescue is always to stay calm when you rescue an abandoned, injured, or sick animal as many people get overwhelmed and have no idea what to do. When I started rescuing, I used to get very worried every time, but then I started to gather information on veterinary hospitals and always carried their contact information in case of emergencies. At the same time, I learned from other rescuers about what to do in emergency situations, such as helping sick animals, attending to animals hit by a car, etc.
 
As I side note, I have to say that people need to do a background check on the rescuers or animal rescue groups that they are planning to help as some “animal rescue groups” are in fact regularly making money out of the animals that they rescue (i.e. asking for huge donations without showing the invoices of vet hospitals, making money by sending Chinese animals abroad and then asking for the payment of “adoption fees”). If someone helps those so-called rescue groups, they are actually helping ruthless people who portray themselves as “animal heroes,” but who, in reality, are just people making money out of the suffering of animals in need of help.

WF: How can regular people support your rescue?

AVD: One very important part of helping rescue cats become more happy and adoptable is by socialising them and spending quality time with them (volunteers are highly encouraged to come and visit them!). They need to get used to being around people, so they can have a smooth transition from the PPAR shelter to their forever loving homes.

Aside from this, there are other options in which people based in Shanghai can help us:
a) Taking good and colourful photographs of the rescue cats living in the PPAR shelter.
c) Volunteering to represent PPAR in flea markets or other events where PPAR participates regularly.
c) Spreading information about our adoptable rescue cats in different mailing lists, websites, and Wechat groups
d) Sharing ideas or suggestions on how to help our rescue cats.

Some of the PPAR rescue cats you can meet or adopt

To help Paw Pals Animal Rescue, visit their website.

Is there an animal shelter in your community that’s worth featuring? Share your suggestions with us by commenting below!

Amazing Acts: Hound Haven

Founded in December 2015 by Maxin Arcebal, Chelsea Pecson, and Addi Dela Cruz, Hound Haven was created as a rehabilitation and adoption center for retired working dogs. The 1,200-square-meter center located in Bulacan, Philippines gives retired canines the proper behavioural and physical training they need to help them adjust to their new lives as house Read More...

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Addi Dela Cruz

Founded in December 2015 by Maxin Arcebal, Chelsea Pecson, and Addi Dela Cruz, Hound Haven was created as a rehabilitation and adoption center for retired working dogs. The 1,200-square-meter center located in Bulacan, Philippines gives retired canines the proper behavioural and physical training they need to help them adjust to their new lives as house pets. 

Waldo’s Friends spoke with Co-Founder and Chief Marketing Officer Addi Dela Cruz who eagerly shared the history and goals of Hound Haven.

Waldo’s Friends (WF): How did Hound Haven come about? 

Addi Dela Cruz (ADC): The founders have always wanted to build another rescue group for abandoned and abused dogs, but we realized there are a lot of organisations who are already catering to this need. 

We discovered that the average working dog works for about 8 to 15 years. More than half of their lives are dedicated in service to humans. And yet there is no standard policy on the retirement of Military Working Dogs (MWD) and Contract Working Dogs (CWD) in the Philippines. So we decided to put up Hound Haven, the first and only institutionalised organisation that caters to this kind of program and advocacy in the country.

WF: What is your personal involvement in Hound Haven?

ADC: I’m in charge of our marketing initiatives and making sure there is a constant buzz about the brand and that we continue to spread awareness about our cause. But since we’re a lean team of five, all of us are involved in operations and marketing Hound Haven.

Hound Haven team (from left to right): Rachelle Arcebal, Jerome Arcebal, Addi Dela Cruz, Maxin Arcebal, and Chelsea Pecson (seated)

WF: What does Hound Haven hope to achieve?

ADC: Our ultimate goal is to influence public policy and replicate Robby’s Law (United States of America H.R. 5314) in the Philippines, which promotes the transfer and adoption of working dogs at the end of their service. After all, for man’s best friend, no medal could ever replace the comfort of home and the love of family.

WF: Are there any interesting stories you can share about Hound Haven?

ADC: Hound Haven’s activities and interaction area is called Shyna’s Yard. It was named after the first dog we wanted to adopt. A few months before her scheduled turnover to us from the Philippine Army, Shyna passed away.

Chika, arguably Hound Haven’s most popular K-9 resident, is not up for adoption. In 2017, we realised that we could never part with the 11-year-old Belgian Malinois, so we decided to keep her and make her our ambassador.

Shyla’s Yard and Chika

WF: Is it true that Hound Haven also adopts non-working dogs?

ADC: We focus on retired working dogs, but as a tradition, we adopt at least one abandoned dog every year—those that are not necessarily working K-9s. Our first rescue was Diego in 2017 whose hind legs were deformed since birth. 

Last year, we rescued Gabby. She was very sick, full of ticks, bleeding from her own scratches, chained to a post in a dumpsite, and seemingly left there to die. Gabby is now one of our most hyperactive, adorable residents at the center. The two are named after our Philippine national heroes, Diego Silang and Gabriela Silang.

Hound Haven adoptees Diego and Gabby

WF: What has been the rescue’s most effective campaigns since its launch in 2015?

ADC: Some of our most effective campaigns are driven by news networks and other media groups that shine the light on our K-9 beneficiary. The biggest would probably be GMA Network’s I-Witness documentary feature entitled “Sundalong Aso” (“Soldiers with Paws”), which presented the state of working dogs in the Philippines and in turn promoted Hound Haven. The episode was even a finalist for Best Documentary Feature at New York Festivals in 2018. Other TV networks and news agencies in the Philippines have also featured us, including TV5, ABS-CBN, Summit Media, Manila Bulletin, and Philippine Daily Inquirer.

WF: What’s your advice to people involved in animal rescue and rehabilitation, and to others thinking of pursuing this cause?

ADC: When you feel like giving up, think about why you started in the first place. 

For those interested in getting into animal rescue, build it with people you trust. Figure out where the funding will come from. Communicating what your cause is about will be very crucial.

WF: What is the most challenging thing about running Hound Haven?

ADC: Soliciting donations. People like to share and talk about our cause on social media, but this buzz doesn’t necessarily translate to donations for us to run the center.

WF: On the flipside, what’s the best thing about it?

ADC: Changing people’s mindset and influencing their behaviour. More than getting our resident K-9s adopted, we feel that Hound Haven’s true value is in being able to make people take an active role in protecting animal rights. When they come home to their own dogs, they apply the behavioural tips that they’ve learned from the talks we hosted. When they think of getting a pet, they decide to adopt instead of shopping and supporting irresponsible animal breeding. When they see another K-9 at the mall, they realize and appreciate the value these heroes’ have in our lives.

WF: How can people support Hound Haven?

ADC: They can donate, sponsor a dog, adopt a dog, or volunteer for our next activity. Right now we’re building the next phase of our kennels so we can welcome and care for more dogs in our facility.

Rehabilitating dogs in kennels

Visit Hound Haven’s website or follow their Facebook and Instagram accounts to get their latest updates. The center also offers young and old an opportunity to interact with the rehabilitating K-9s through field trips, team building activities, and weekend excursions.

Do you know of inspiring animal shelters or wildlife rehabilitation centers worth featuring? Share your suggestions with us by commenting below!

Interview: Steve Veigel from atcharlie

I first came across atcharlie while searching online for animal rescue supporters who aren’t affiliated with any shelter, clinic or hospital – but support the ecosystem through communities and awareness; someone who does it for the love and compassion above and beyond a vocation or business-for-profit. When I found the website, I was excited to Read More...

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Steve with his daughter’s dog: Parker.

I first came across atcharlie while searching online for animal rescue supporters who aren’t affiliated with any shelter, clinic or hospital – but support the ecosystem through communities and awareness; someone who does it for the love and compassion above and beyond a vocation or business-for-profit. When I found the website, I was excited to see that Steve was doing what I planned to do – share resources and profiles of animal shelters doing great work. I wrote to him with information about Waldo’s Friends, and – as any good website content builder would – requested a backlink for a rescue dog adoption guide. Several emails and a wonderful shoutout to Waldo’s Friends later, I realised that I had found a mentor and kindred spirit. I hope this interview gives you a peak into his ideas and work for saving abandoned animals, and spreads his unrelenting message of love at all costs.

Waldo’s Friends (WF): All your articles about rescue shelters are detailed and evocative. They encapsulate each rescue’s specific experiences, while putting things within context of the world at large (such as how BROOD began with the backdrop of tech in 1996). Particularly poignant are your descriptions of the people behind these rescues (like the amazing dog man of Wedowee) and their communities (as in the case of the Lonesome Dove Rescue). Could you tell us about your first article about a rescue, and how it affected your future articles?

Steven Veigel (SV): I always understood people trying to start a business. Like anything else, a rescue is dealing with competition. Competition for donations to survive as an organization. But with a rescue it’s not just about the business end you have to consider. It’s looking at animals, looking back at you, who cannot survive without you. It’s about their food, shelter, and medical care. It’s like caring for little children.

My first attempt at an article was actually “Hope for Life” in 2013. Pauline Cushman ran a rescue for cats and dogs in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The building was divided into two areas. One was Hope Center where she cared for abandoned animals, and Hope’s Garden Resort Boutique where dogs with owners were groomed and kenneled. The Boutique then gave her additional funds for the Hope Center.

I had just started my website with a few listings and Charlie’s story. I think I had about 40 visitors to my site (now over a million per year) and I had no idea how to interview people. But “Hope for Life” is where we got Sammy. Sammy was a dog we knew had cancer (mentioned at the beginning of Charlie’s story), so if you want to get started, go where you know and learn how to ask questions.

Pauline had never met me but knew we adopted Sammy. That at least gave us something in common to talk about. When I arrived, she was cordial but a little suspicious. What I didn’t know was that she previously had some people nosing around. She thought they were there to adopt an animal, but they weren’t. They were just poking around in her business. But despite any concerns about my true intention, she let volunteers give me a tour, spoke with me about the animal control facilities she rescued animals from in different US states, and her efforts to get the animals adopted. I watched her handling day-to-day situations with papers all over her desk. When we finished, I walked away with a few scraps of notes and a new appreciation for the dedication it took to keep operating as a charity.

What impacted me the most was when Pauline said, “It shouldn’t be about the organization. It’s about the animals.” To this day, I continue to echo those words: “It’s about the animals.”

WF: In your articles about personal experiences with rescuing animals, you’ve mentioned adopting Charlie, then fostering and eventually adopting Smoke and Ginnie, and fostering several others. Could you tell us about your decision to foster and adopt “difficult” dogs?


SV: I had grown up around farm animals and pets, but Charlie is the dog that motivated my efforts. If you will for a moment, imagine a dog that’s so quick and agile that it takes two people to corral him in a small backyard. Then, imagine you get him in the house and he leaps on top of a closed wood roll top desk and stands there balancing himself on the curvature of the roll top. He was just confused and fearful of where he was now. He had no idea what a house meant.

Charlie’s story is not just a dog story. It’s about how I had to break down his issues into manageable categories and goals. Charlie gamed me, forced me to learn, tested me, and made me understand his emotional struggle and intellectual nature on a far deeper level than I ever had to think about.

With Charlie, we had four dogs to manage and it became my responsibility. When Charlie passed, we were motivated to foster more dogs. Our experience with fostering, and then adopting our fosters, was wonderful. We had many really sweet dogs. We had a reputation with Basset Rescue of Old Dominion (BROOD) and on our original adoption application, I selected “willing to work with difficult dogs.” So when Lisa at BROOD called asking if we could help with a special case, we did. We knowingly took dogs with aggressive cancers understanding they were only going to live one to three months. That was difficult, but we gained so much from their love it only deepened our commitment. And that brought us to Smoke and Ginnie. Two dogs that no one was going to take in, especially because they were an older bonded pair that had to be adopted together. When they arrived my wife, Jenny remarked, “Oh my, they are Charlie times two. They’re your responsibility.” They weren’t that difficult, but they did have issues.

Before Charlie, we’d have three dogs and a cat. After Charlie, we’d have four to five dogs in the house. My wife then started calling me “the dog herder.” This was not anything official. More of a title of amusement as I walked around the house with all the dogs following me and gathering wherever I was trying to work.

When I had my first knee surgery, I had to do everything with a walker, but that didn’t change the fact that I had four dogs to take care of and I was determined to do everything myself. In the beginning, a therapist would come to the house to get me started on recovery. One day she wanted to see if I could get out the back door and then back into the house properly using my walker. I not only accomplished this with the walker, I did it with the walker, a cup of coffee, and four dogs. Impressed with how I managed it all, the therapist concluded, “Well, I think we have that one covered.”

WF: What is your recommendation for people who want to follow in your steps in adopting “difficult dogs” but are hesitant due to jobs and kids?

SV: I think it’s worth noting that some things we took on did not represent a normal dog adoption. And Charlie did nip my mother-in-law in the butt. In Charlie’s defense, she wasn’t dog friendly and she did surprise us about four o’clock in the morning with a brief visit. The small hallway was dark, the dogs were barking, Charlie didn’t know her, and in our surprise, we were not paying attention to the dogs. Charlie was still new to the house, confused, and thought she might be a threat.

It’s funny now and she did not really get hurt, but it impressed me with the basic rule: Be aware of the situation and don’t put the dog in a position you know will get him in trouble. If we had just turned on the lights and got the dogs under control for a moment, Charlie never would have felt the need.

Steve and Charlie

If you want to help “difficult dogs,” understand that we’re not talking “dangerous dogs.” Difficult dogs are anxious, lacking guidance, and a bit fearful for their situation. They sometimes get labeled “dangerous” because they are unruly, like someone insisted on improperly feeding them a treat by hand and kept getting nipped. Start off by reading Charlie’s and Smoke and Ginnie’s stories. Pay attention to some subtle changes in behaviour I try to bring attention to. Learn some basic dog training, and go in with commitment. Understand you are taking responsibility for a life. They’re not a toaster you return because you don’t like the model. They’re living, feeling, sentient beings. And they are not there to protect you. You’re there to protect them.

There are literally hundreds of sweet dogs who just need a home. Rescues generally do their best to pair you with a dog that will fit your situation. Try to time your adoption when you have a couple days off so the dog can explore the house under supervision and get to know you. Don’t let small children create confusion where the dog is trying to eat. Give them a comfort zone of about six feet (two meters). Your house is already strange to them and even an established pet deserves to eat in peace. Also, don’t let small children walk around with food in their hand. Dogs are opportunistic. If they can take the cookie, depending on their previous living conditions, they might. Don’t put them in that position. And then, don’t blame the dog.

WF: Your animal rescue directory shines the light on rescue shelters. Unlike sponsored and funded organisations in animal rescue who focus almost exclusively on pet adoption listings, you focus on volunteers and organisations that run with low to no funding. Could you tell us about your decision to focus on the rescue shelters and not on animal adoption listings?

SV: I don’t really care if someone is an “established charity.” Established charities had to start somewhere and I try to note that. If someone is doing a good job trying to get pets adopted, I’m in their corner. With our throw-away societies there are just far too many animals who need our help. The only way to make a dent in the problem is to assist, advise, and encourage those who have the motivation and the dedication to take it on.

I try to bring attention to the efforts of animal rescues large and small. My articles serve two purposes. First of all, I try to invite people to learn more about animals, animal care, and the people. Second, if my article draws a reader because they’re searching for “why do dogs eat poop” (for example), maybe they’ll also notice the rescue listings while they’re on my site. Maybe they’ll be encouraged to adopt an animal and/or get involved with people in their area.

WF: You comment on the nature of volunteers, and this sentiment (mentioned in your article about BROOD) stands out: “These people struggling in the animal rescue community to get our attention are among our unsung heroes who represent the best of humanity. It doesn’t take much to help them.” In your experience, what do you consider the most challenging hurdles that a rescue shelter faces, and how best, in your opinion, do you think that regular people like us can empower them?

SV: I think the most challenging hurdles that rescues face are donations and volunteers. You can’t buy food or provide medical care if you can’t get donations. Some rescues are working in economically depressed regions, and not everyone is a master at fundraising. Just getting the donation page of your website noticed is extremely difficult given the nature of search engine rankings. That’s another major reason I do my listings. If someone finds my website, I then increase the odds (just a bit) that one of the rescues I list will also get noticed.

As for the volunteers I mentioned, they’re great people but they’re not employees. They have other employment and families they’re obligated to and they can’t always be there. On that topic, I’d like to mention that volunteering doesn’t have to take all your time. Some rescues just need help from time to time to transport a dog. They develop a list of volunteers and then put out an email to coordinate those available. I recall one time Lisa from BROOD was traveling 176 miles to bring us a foster named Caitlyn. She was also trying to pick up another dog they were rescuing from animal control in Portsmouth, Virginia. To save her time and distance, my wife drove the half hour to Portsmouth and retrieved the dog there. We brought it to our house for a couple of hours and then drove a ways to meet Lisa in a shopping center parking lot to exchange dogs. It was a good experience and we got to finally meet Lisa and chat a bit.

Donations and volunteering help empower rescues. Businesses here often provide a percentage of sales to rescues which is good for them and tax deductible. There’s even a group here in the US called Rescue Bank who developed a warehousing and distribution system for pet food. They get pet food donated (some probably overstocked) from pet food manufacturers, and then provide the food to rescues at a greatly discounted rate. The pet food manufacturers then get a tax deduction and also get to tout how they support animal rescue.

no-kill animal shelter

No-kill animal shelter

“Each and every animal on earth has as much right to be here as you and me.” – A.D Williams This quote sums up the mission statement of any legitimate no-kill animal shelter in existence today. But, what exactly is a no-kill animal shelter? A no-kill animal shelter is an animal rescue shelter that doesn’t euthanise Read More...

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“Each and every animal on earth has as much right to be here as you and me.” – A.D Williams

This quote sums up the mission statement of any legitimate no-kill animal shelter in existence today. But, what exactly is a no-kill animal shelter? A no-kill animal shelter is an animal rescue shelter that doesn’t euthanise healthy animals as a means of population control (“No-Kill Shelter”). Unlike conventional animal shelters that use euthanasia to control the animal population, no-kill animal shelters rely on adoption programs and neutering or spaying. Euthanasia in no-kill animal shelters is a reserve for the terminally ill animals and animals that are a danger to public safety. In this article, we are going to look at no-kill animal shelters from the following angles:

  • What is the no-kill movement?
  • What are the principles of no-kill animal shelters?
  • Does the no-kill policy benefit animals?
  • How can you participate in the no-kill movement?
  • Do we need more no-kill animal shelters?

What is the no-kill movement?

The no-kill movement condemns the killing of treatable and healthy animals in shelters for population control and convenience. Pets play a critical role in providing us with much-needed companionship. They are our emotional support systems. Sadly, some people do not value them as members of their families. This is why countless animals end up on the streets and eventually in an animal shelter because their owners abandoned or abused them.

According to a nationwide study in Australia, 25% of dogs and 56% of cats that end up in council pounds end up getting euthanised (“What is the no kill movement”). However, this isn’t the only solution to how we can deal with the issue of abandoned animals. With more people participating in pet adoption drives and increased awareness about adopting from shelters, this trend of animal cruelty for convenience is slowly being reversed.

What are the principles of no-kill animal shelters?

No-kill shelters in Australia run on the principles of open-mindedness, voluntary services, neutering & spaying, medical & behaviour programs, pet retention, and adoption programs.

Open-mindedness

Change has to start at the top. Animal shelters need to have open-minded leaders for them to embrace the no-kill policy. Otherwise, all efforts will be in vain. Directors in conventional animal shelters need enlightening on the benefits of adopting the no-kill policy.

Voluntary service

Taking care of animals is no small feat. It is not cheap either which is why the no-kill movement encourages voluntary participation from members of the community. Volunteers can assist many ways from donating food and services to volunteering to foster a few animals when the shelter is full. Volunteers are the backbone of the no-kill movement.

Neutering & spaying

Population control is critical in animal shelters to ensure that the number of animals is proportionate to the available resources. Neutering and spaying the animals helps control the population without euthanising healthy animals. Encouraging adoption also helps free up space in the shelters while raising money to take care of the animals left behind.

Medical & behaviour programs

Aggressive animal behaviour is one of the leading reasons for euthanasia in typical animal shelters. A dog pound will euthanise an animal the moment it shows signs of aggressive behaviour. This is, however avoidable with a few changes in pounds’ and shelters’ pet care policies. The no-kill movement advocates for comprehensive socialisation, handling and cleaning of animals to keep them healthy, happy, and friendly.

Pet retention

Some of the pets end up in shelters and pounds because their owners cannot keep them due to circumstances such as frequent travelling or moving into apartments that do not allow pets. The no-kill movement seeks to reduce such cases by giving advice that assists pet owners to keep their pets.

Adoption programs

You might have heard the slogan, “Adopt don’t shop.” It means that you should adopt a pet instead of buying. The no-kill movement encourages people to adopt pets from local animal shelters through campaigns and incentives. It is an effective and humane way to depopulate the shelters.

Does the no-kill policy benefit animals?

There is no straight answer on whether the no-kill policy is beneficial to animals or not. Many critics believe that no-kill is a myth. They argue that a no-kill shelter shouldn’t euthanise any animal no matter how sick and aggressive it is. No-kill shelters, however, euthanise terminally ill and aggressive animals. Another issue that arises is the fact that there are no universal guidelines that define a no-kill shelter. A shelter can easily label itself as a no-kill shelter without oversight or vetting from an independent regulatory body. This lack of regulation leaves a lot of wiggle room for how shelters operate and how they decide the animals that live and those that get euthanasia. For example, two no-kill shelters might differ in opinion regarding whether an amputated dog lives or dies.

On the other hand, advocates of the no-kill policy believe that it is a lifeline for abandoned animals in rescue shelters. According to no-kill policy advocates, implementing a no-kill system in animal shelters results in saved lives and happy families. These shelters play a huge role in resolving animal homelessness and finding good loving homes for the rescued animals.

So does the no-kill policy benefit animals? It all depends on how you decide to look at it. It is more or less a half empty-half full glass scenario. Sure, the no-kill policy has its flaws, but that does not mean that we should ignore the good it is doing for the rescued animals. It is a step in the right direction towards ensuring that animals get their right to live.

How can you participate in the no-kill movement?

Volunteer! Volunteer! Volunteer! While volunteering might not be the only way to participate in the no-kill movement, it does help a lot. In fact, voluntary services are core part of any shelter’s no-kill efforts whether through foster carers, donors, fundraisers or dog walkers. No-kill shelters often run short of resources due to the high number of animals under their care. The least we can do is to get involved as volunteers – in any capacity possible. You can become a foster carer so that your local animal shelter can free up space to rescue more animals. You can also donate cash or items that you feel might be helpful to the animals at the shelter.

Besides volunteering and donating, you can support the no-kill movement by adopting pets from no-kill shelters instead of buying them from breeders. Adopting from shelters ensures that an animal gets a loving home and frees up a spot for another animal that needs rescuing.

Taking part in awareness campaigns is yet another way for you to participate in the no-kill movement. Getting valuable buy-ins from local councils and local shelters to adopt the no-kill movement is critical to how far and wide it spreads. The more that people learn about the no-kill approach, the easier it will be to convince shelters to consider it and the community to adopt instead of buying.

Do we need more no-kill animal shelters?

To answer this, we will need to first look at some statistics. Australia is among the countries with the highest rate of pet ownership with over 60% of Australian homes owning a pet (“Cat and Dog Euthanasia in Australia”). Unfortunately, the high rate of ownership translates to many animals ending up in pounds and shelters. Many people don’t know what to do with their pets when faced with scenarios such as moving to a new country or moving into an apartment that does not allow pets. All of this adds up to more pets abandoned or surrendered to the shelters.

Without no-kill animal shelters, surrendering your pet to a shelter is akin to convicting her to a death sentence. According to statistics, out of the hundreds of thousands of animals taken into shelters and pounds annually, more than 50% end up dead (“Thousands of Animals Killed for ‘Convenience’.”). With no-kill animal shelters, we can rest easy that careless pet ownership will not be the cause for an innocent animal’s death. So to answer the question, yes, we need more no-kill animal shelters.

It’s important to add here that alongside this movement, we also need stricter laws in place to deal with reckless pet purchases from breeders, as well as legal repercussions for abandoning healthy animals. No-kill shelters should not become a happy escape for pet owners, rather they should work together with awareness drives that discourage people from buying/adopting pets they can’t care for in the long term.

All things considered…

The no-kill movement has revolutionised the world of animal rescue. It has introduced a much-needed change that we can’t ignore. We are slowly moving on from a time when losing your dog for more than 72 hours meant that you might never see her again. Today, losing your dog is no longer a death sentence for them. The community is sensitised on animals’ rights to life now more than ever. As a result, we can see more humane treatment of animals in most animal rescue centres and pounds. We can also see many people volunteering and donating to animal shelters while embracing the “Adopt don’t shop” mantra.

If you’re considering adopting your very own dog or cat, look no further. Here are some pet adoption guides that will make the decision to adopt from a shelter a lot easier.

 

References:

“Cat and Dog Euthanasia in Australia.” Pets4Life, Pets4Life, pets4life.com.au/cat-and-dog-euthanasia-in-australia/.

Tory Shepherd. “Thousands of Animals Killed for ‘Convenience’.” NewsComAu, 24 Sept. 2012, www.news.com.au/national/shelter-animals-killed-for-convenience/news-story/efbca3dcfc2d619c6f1fc633b92c99cf.

Townend, Mark. “No Kill Animal Shelters | Blog.” RSPCA Queensland, www.rspcaqld.org.au/blog/fact-check/the-no-kill-shelter-myth.

“What Is the No Kill Movement?” PetRescue – Create Happiness. Save Lives. – PetRescue, Pet Rescue, www.petrescue.com.au/library/articles/no-kill-movement.

“No-Kill Shelter.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 27 Aug. 2018, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-kill_shelter.

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