Category: Cruelty free

Is SkinCeuticals Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, SkinCeuticals is not cruelty free. The long answer: SkinCeuticals was founded in 1997 by Dr. Sheldon Pinnell, a scientist, dermatologist, and skincare chemist whose aim was to change the face of topical antioxidants. The brand promises to create advanced skincare products backed by science. In 2005, the L’Oréal Group purchased the Read More...

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The short answer: No, SkinCeuticals is not cruelty free.

The long answer: SkinCeuticals was founded in 1997 by Dr. Sheldon Pinnell, a scientist, dermatologist, and skincare chemist whose aim was to change the face of topical antioxidants. The brand promises to create advanced skincare products backed by science. In 2005, the L’Oréal Group purchased the American skin care line. 

On its website, SkinCeuticals claims that it “does not test any of its products or any of its ingredients on animals, anywhere in the world nor does SkinCeuticals delegate this task to others. The only possible exception is if regulatory authorities required it for safety or regulatory purposes.” The so-called exception pertains to China, a massive country where products by SkinCeuticals and its sister brands Vichy Laboratories and La Roche-Posay are being sold. SkinCeuticals grants Chinese health officials and/or authorised third parties permission to conduct animal testing with their products, guaranteeing that they are safe for human use. Because of this, the skin care brand cannot be called cruelty free.  

References:

Customer Service

Is SkinCeuticals Cruelty-Free?

Cruelty Free Kitty: SkinCeuticals

Is SkinCeuticals Cruelty-Free or Vegan?

Is Aquaphor Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Aquaphor is not cruelty free. The long answer: Developed in 1925, Aquaphor is a skin care brand known for its “healing” properties. The ointment supposedly creates a semi-occlusive barrier on the skin that allows the outflow of excess fluid and the inflow of oxygen. Presently, the brand carries four categories: body Read More...

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The short answer: No, Aquaphor is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Developed in 1925, Aquaphor is a skin care brand known for its “healing” properties. The ointment supposedly creates a semi-occlusive barrier on the skin that allows the outflow of excess fluid and the inflow of oxygen. Presently, the brand carries four categories: body care, baby care, lip care, and minor wound care.

Aquaphor is owned by Beiersdorf, Inc., a German multinational company that also owns NIVEA. The brand does not state its stance on animal testing on its official website. Nevertheless, a quick check on its parent website reveals that Beiersdorf is committed to making animal testing obsolete worldwide. It says, “We are convinced that animal testing is not necessary to prove the skin tolerability and effectiveness of our cosmetic products. This is why we do not conduct any animal testing for our cosmetic products and their ingredients, and do not have any animal testing done on our behalf—unless, in the very rare case, this is specifically required by law.”

The last phrase points to Aquaphor being sold in countries that have mandatory animal testing regulations to guarantee user safety. With this in mind, Aquaphor cannot claim to be cruelty free unless they refrain from selling their products in China and other countries with similar laws. 

References:

Aquaphor

Is Aquaphor Vegan? Here’s What I Found Out!

Research for Alternatives to Animal Testing

Is Aquaphor Cruelty-Free and Vegan? 

Is Guerlain Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Guerlain is not cruelty free. The long answer: Founded in 1828, Guerlain is one of the oldest perfume, cosmetics, and skincare houses in the world. It was created in Paris by Pierre-François Pascal Guerlain, a French perfumer. In 1994, Guerlain was bought by the French multinational company LVMH, which also owns Read More...

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The short answer: No, Guerlain is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Founded in 1828, Guerlain is one of the oldest perfume, cosmetics, and skincare houses in the world. It was created in Paris by Pierre-François Pascal Guerlain, a French perfumer. In 1994, Guerlain was bought by the French multinational company LVMH, which also owns Benefit Cosmetics

Guerlain does not publish its animal testing stance on its US website. Through a correspondence with Ethical Elephant, the company says, “In the Name of Beauty, Guerlain is committed to a more sustainable world, and our initiatives include protection of biodiversity. At no stage of development or manufacturing do we test either our products, or the raw materials used to make them on animals. The LVMH Group is strongly attached to eliminating animal testing of cosmetics products everywhere in the world. LVMH plays a prominent role in developing alternatives through its support for organizations such as the American Fund for Alternatives to Animal Testing, or its active participation to the work of the European cosmetics association (Cosmetics Europe).”

However, additional information reveals that Guerlain sells products in countries that are not necessarily cruelty free. Guerlain states, “In China, where our products are marketed, authorities require that certain imported cosmetics products be tested on animals, considered the best way to guarantee consumer safety. We do not perform these tests, which are done by independent laboratories. There is thus a strong engagement and mobilisation of various cosmetics companies and associations to work with the Chinese authorities to ensure a change of the Chinese rules on imported products and the recognition of alternatives to animal testing. The NGO PETA has placed Guerlain on its list of Companies That Do Test on Animals due to the marketing of our products in China.”

The brand adds, “Again, we do not test any of our products on animals and we are strongly engaged in efforts to eliminate animal testing. We believe that by working with Chinese authorities we can have more meaningful influence to encourage changes to regulations, ultimately leading to the total elimination of animal testing.”

Despite the fact that the French beauty brand does not perform the tests on animals, they must comply with Chinese laws to guarantee consumer safety. As such, they cannot be considered 100% cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Guerlain

Cruelty Free Kitty: Guerlain

Is Guerlain Cruelty-Free in 2020? (What You Need To Know Before You Buy!)

Is Crest Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Crest is not cruelty free. The long answer: Created by the American multinational corporation Procter & Gamble, Crest is a brand that sells oral hygiene products. It began selling toothpaste with the name Fluoristan back in 1954, and soon expanded its brand to make and distribute toothbrush, mouthwash, dental floss, and Read More...

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The short answer: No, Crest is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Created by the American multinational corporation Procter & Gamble, Crest is a brand that sells oral hygiene products. It began selling toothpaste with the name Fluoristan back in 1954, and soon expanded its brand to make and distribute toothbrush, mouthwash, dental floss, and tooth whitening strips. 

There is no mention of animal testing on Crest’s official US website. On the P&G website, Crest’s parent company states that they have “invested in non-animal test method development for decades, and is also a founding sponsor and has been a leading presenter at every World Congress on non-animal test methods to date—involving thousands of scientists, regulators, and policy makers. We continue to partner with leading international animal welfare organizations, academia, industry coalitions, and policy makers to promote alternatives to animal testing and gain their regulatory acceptance. Together, we have achieved a lot. We stopped animal testing our cosmetics products many years ago. In fact, P&G no longer animal tests any consumer product unless required by law and we are committed to make animal testing obsolete.”

The phrase “unless required by law” is concerning because it means the company has to comply with a country’s rules and regulations before their products can be sold there. This pertains to China, where Crest and other P&G brands (such as Head & Shoulders, Olay, and Pantene) are being sold. This is a country known for conducting tests on animals before and possibly after a product gets released in the market. With these facts, Crest cannot be considered 100% cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Crest

Cruelty Free Kitty: Crest

Is Crest Cruelty-Free in 2020?

Be Cruelty Free

Is Bed Head Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Bed Head is not cruelty free. The long answer: Bed Head is a hair care brand distributed by TIGI. Its products are manufactured with the goal of enhancing the hair cut, colour, style, and finish of its users. These products are used by professional hairdressers and sold through salons and select Read More...

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The short answer: No, Bed Head is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Bed Head is a hair care brand distributed by TIGI. Its products are manufactured with the goal of enhancing the hair cut, colour, style, and finish of its users. These products are used by professional hairdressers and sold through salons and select distributors. 

In 2009, Bed Head was acquired by Unilever, a global multinational company known for selling and distributing its products in China. A quick search on its UK website shows that Bed Head doesn’t seem to sell its products in China. However, their official animal testing policy posted on Cruelty Free Kitty states, “We do not test our products on animals and are committed to ending animal testing. Unilever has complied with the EU animal testing bans for cosmetics since 2004 and supports calls for similar bans to be introduced globally. Occasionally, across our portfolio, some of the ingredients we use have to be tested by our suppliers to comply with legal and regulatory requirements in some markets; and some governments test certain products on animals as part of their regulations.”

The last sentence confirms that Bed Head must comply with a country’s laws to be able to sell their products there. With this in mind, Bed Head cannot be considered 100% cruelty free.

References:

TIGI

CFK: Bed Head

Brands to Avoid (Brands That Are Not Cruelty-Free)

Why Unilever is NOT a Cruelty-Free Corporation!

Is Old Spice Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Old Spice is not cruelty free. The long answer: Old Spice is an American brand that has been selling male grooming products as early as 1937. It is known for its deodorants and antiperspirants, but has expanded its range to sell grooming products such as shampoos, body washes, and soaps. It Read More...

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The short answer: No, Old Spice is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Old Spice is an American brand that has been selling male grooming products as early as 1937. It is known for its deodorants and antiperspirants, but has expanded its range to sell grooming products such as shampoos, body washes, and soaps. It was originally owned by Shulton Company, which was founded by William Lightfoot Schultz. In 1990, ownership was transferred to American multinational consumer goods corporation, Procter & Gamble.

Old Spice’s official website does not contain detailed information about their position on animal testing. However, its parent company reveals on its website: “P&G has invested in non-animal test method development for decades, and is also a founding sponsor and has been a leading presenter at every World Congress on non-animal test methods to date- involving thousands of scientists, regulators, and policy makers. We continue to partner with leading international animal welfare organizations, academia, industry coalitions and policy makers to promote alternatives to animal testing and gain their regulatory acceptance. Together, we have achieved a lot. We stopped animal testing our cosmetics products many years ago. In fact, P&G no longer animal tests any consumer product unless required by law and we are committed to make animal testing obsolete.”

At present, Old Spice products are available in mainland China. This particular country requires all imported grooming products to be tested on animals, which are conducted by health officials or authorised third parties. Old Spice and P&G need to comply with Chinese mandatory regulations to be able to sell its products in the country. Therefore, the men’s grooming brand cannot be considered completely cruelty free.  

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Old Spice

CFK: Old Spice

Is Old Spice Cruelty-Free in 2020?

Our Commitment to Be Cruelty Free

Is Nexxus Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Nexxus is not cruelty free. The long answer: Nexxus is a hair care brand that was founded in 1979. It aims to develop salon knowledge with scientific techniques to create products for specific hair textures, hair styles, and levels of hair damage. Originally bought out by the Alberto-Culver company, Nexxus was Read More...

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The short answer: No, Nexxus is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Nexxus is a hair care brand that was founded in 1979. It aims to develop salon knowledge with scientific techniques to create products for specific hair textures, hair styles, and levels of hair damage. Originally bought out by the Alberto-Culver company, Nexxus was later on purchased by Unilever

On their official US website, Nexxus states: “We do not test our products on animals and are committed to ending animal testing. Unilever has complied with the EU animal testing bans for cosmetics since 2004 and supports calls for similar bans to be introduced globally.

Since the 1980s, Unilever has remained at the forefront of research into non-animal approaches to assess product safety, and we advocate effective, science-based regulation on alternatives to animal testing that ensures consumer safety and facilitates innovation.”

However, research has confirmed that Nexxus is being sold in China. This means that the hair care brand has agreed to follow Chinese importation laws, which include testing its products on animals before and possibly after it is released in the market. Until Nexxus stops selling its products in China or the country changes their laws on animal testing, Nexxus cannot be considered a cruelty-free brand.   

References:

Unilever: Nexxus

FAQs

CFK: Nexxus

Is Nexxus Cruelty-Free and Vegan?

Is Kérastase Cruelty Free?

The short answer:  No, Kérastase is not cruelty free. The long answer: A part of the L’Oréal Professional Products Division, Kérastase is a French luxury hair care line that was founded in 1964. Its products are primarily sold at luxury salons and through its official website. On its US site, Kérastase reveals, “We are happy Read More...

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The short answer:  No, Kérastase is not cruelty free.

The long answer: A part of the L’Oréal Professional Products Division, Kérastase is a French luxury hair care line that was founded in 1964. Its products are primarily sold at luxury salons and through its official website. On its US site, Kérastase reveals, “We are happy to confirm that the L’Oréal group of companies, which includes Lancôme, Redken, Garnier, Ralph Lauren, Giorgio Armani, Biotherm, Kérastase, and Vichy, as well as L’Oréal, has carried out no animal testing since 1989 on the entire range of its products. This decision was undertaken within the framework of our fundamental objectives: to offer innovative products of high quality while ensuring their safety in use by our customers. For information about the significant efforts deployed by our laboratories over a period of 25 years to develop alternative methods to animal testing, as well as our very important achievements in this field, please consult our website at http://www.lorealusa.com.”

Despite the brand’s claims, it is important to know that Kérastase is being sold in mainland China. This country is known for requiring imported hair care products to be tested on animals before being distributed throughout the country. Authorised third parties or health officials may also do random tests on Kérastase products that are already available in the market. With this knowledge, Kérastase cannot claim to be 100% cruelty free. 

References:

FAQs

Beauty Without Bunnies: Kerastase

Wikipedia: Kerastase

CFK: Kerastase

Is Kerastase Cruelty-Free?

Is Biolage Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Biolage is not cruelty free. The long answer: Biolage is a brand that uses botanical ingredients to create professional hair care and hair styling products. It was developed by the hair styling duo, Arnie and Sydell Miller, who founded Matrix. Ten years after Matrix was born, Biolage was introduced in the Read More...

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The short answer: No, Biolage is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Biolage is a brand that uses botanical ingredients to create professional hair care and hair styling products. It was developed by the hair styling duo, Arnie and Sydell Miller, who founded Matrix. Ten years after Matrix was born, Biolage was introduced in the American market. 

Currently owned by French personal care company L’Oréal, Biolage does not reveal its viewpoint on animal testing on its official website. Similarly, it also does not indicate whether its raw materials are tested on animals. At present, multiple sources indicate that the brand is available in China. This implies that before being sold in the market, their products must be tested on animals to ensure safety. Chinese laws also allow health officials to do random animal testing, even after the products have already hit the shelves. Because of these reasons, Biolage cannot be considered cruelty free.

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Matrix

Biolage: About Us

Is Matrix Cruelty-Free in 2020?

CFK: Matrix

Is Wella Professionals Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Wella Professionals is not cruelty free. The long answer: Short for Wella, Wella Professionals is a German hair care company that was created by Franz Ströher in 1880. The company specializes in manufacturing hair care, hair styling, and hair colouring products for personal and professional use. In 2015, Wella was sold Read More...

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The short answer: No, Wella Professionals is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Short for Wella, Wella Professionals is a German hair care company that was created by Franz Ströher in 1880. The company specializes in manufacturing hair care, hair styling, and hair colouring products for personal and professional use. In 2015, Wella was sold by Procter & Gamble to Coty, Inc. Alongside Wella, the multinational beauty company also develops and distributes Max Factor and CoverGirl (a cruelty-free brand!). 

Wella does not disclose its animal testing stance on its official website. However, various sources have revealed that its products are available in China. Ethical Elephant has posted a correspondence with Wella, in which the company states, “We do not perform, nor do we ever commission any third parties on our behalf to perform, testing of our products or ingredients on animals, except where required by law.” They also added, “It is common knowledge that China requires mandatory animal tests on all cosmetic products imported into the country. We continue to be involved in the dialogue with the Chinese authorities, including through our active membership of the China Association of Fragrance Flavor and Cosmetic Industries (CAFFCI), to replace animal tests with alternatives.”

Until China changes its laws on animal testing or Wella discontinues selling its products in said country, the hair care company cannot claim to be cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Wella

Wella Professionals

Wikipedia: Wella

Is Wella Cruelty-Free? (What You Need To Know Before You Buy!)

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