Category: Cruelty free

Is Dove Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Dove is not entirely cruelty free. The long answer: Dove is a personal care brand that was established in 1957. It first sold its revolutionary beauty cleansing bar, and gradually expanded to moisturising body washes, body creams, and even a baby-friendly category. It is currently owned by Unilever, which also produces Read More...

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The short answer: No, Dove is not entirely cruelty free.

The long answer: Dove is a personal care brand that was established in 1957. It first sold its revolutionary beauty cleansing bar, and gradually expanded to moisturising body washes, body creams, and even a baby-friendly category. It is currently owned by Unilever, which also produces and distributes Vaseline and TRESemmé

On its website, Dove claims, “Dove does not test on animals. For over 30 years, we’ve used multiple alternative, non-animal approaches to test the safety of our products and ingredients. We have removed all permissions for testing of our products by governments on our behalf. 

We are excited to announce that Dove has been certified as cruelty-free by PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies Program. And now our products are entitled to carry PETA’s cruelty-free logo from PETA, something we are phasing in across all our packs progressively from next year. Our parent company, Unilever, has announced that it supports calls for a global ban on animal testing, similar to the existing EU ban.”

Despite its claims, Cruelty Free Kitty and Cruelty Free Guide report that Dove is being sold in China. This means that the brand is subjected to China’s laws, which include testing beauty products on animals whenever the need arises (ie. when a customer files a complaint). Cruelty Free Guide states that Dove has started manufacturing products in China so that they can eliminate the need for testing imported items. But the fact remains, Dove must comply with China’s animal testing regulations to be able to sell in that particular country. Therefore, they cannot be considered completely cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Dove

Real beauty is cruelty free

CFK: Dove

Is Dove Cruelty Free? Is it Vegan?

Is Bumble and bumble Cruelty Free?

The short answer: Yes, Bumble and bumble is cruelty free. The long answer: Bumble and bumble is a hair care brand that is considered cruelty free because of its PETA certification and the fact that it does not sell its products in China. It began as a hair salon in 1977 by Michael Gordon, a Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, Bumble and bumble is cruelty free.

The long answer: Bumble and bumble is a hair care brand that is considered cruelty free because of its PETA certification and the fact that it does not sell its products in China. It began as a hair salon in 1977 by Michael Gordon, a hairdresser and entrepreneur. On its UK website, the hair care brand discusses its stance on animal testing, saying: 

“Bumble and bumble, LLC. is committed to the elimination of animal testing. We are equally committed to consumer health and safety, and bringing to market products that comply with applicable regulations in every country in which our products are sold.

We do not conduct animal testing on our products or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except when required by law. We evaluate our finished products in clinical tests on volunteer panels.

Bumble and bumble, LLC. fully supports the development and global acceptance of non-animal testing alternatives. To this end, the Company works extensively with the industry at large and the global scientific community to research and fund these alternatives.”

However, it is important to note that Bumble and bumble has been owned by Estée Lauder Companies since 2006. The company is known for selling particular brands in China, such as Estée Lauder and Bobbi Brown Cosmetics. On its website, Estée Lauder Companies states: “The Estée Lauder Companies is a global company with 25+ brands, sold in 150 countries and territories. While most regulatory bodies accept non-animal data to demonstrate safety in cosmetics, some regulatory bodies require the testing of our products or ingredients on animals to demonstrate cosmetics safety. In such cases, we take all practical and available steps to encourage the acceptance of existing non-animal test data instead.”

To purchase cruelty-free Bumble and bumble hair products, visit their website

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Bumble and Bumble

Customer Service

Animal Testing

Is Bumble and Bumble Cruelty-Free in 2020?

CFK: Bumble and Bumble

Is John Frieda Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, John Frieda is not cruelty free. The long answer: A British celebrity hairstylist, John Frieda is the founder of his eponymous hair product line. In 2002, the brand was acquired by Japanese company, Kao Corporation. They are the makers of Bioré. In response to animal testing queries, the brand states, “We Read More...

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The short answer: No, John Frieda is not cruelty free.

The long answer: A British celebrity hairstylist, John Frieda is the founder of his eponymous hair product line. In 2002, the brand was acquired by Japanese company, Kao Corporation. They are the makers of Bioré. In response to animal testing queries, the brand states, “We are often asked if John Frieda products are cruelty-free. In our never-ending quest to get our transformative formulas just right, we test our formulas rigorously, but we absolutely do not test on animals.”

The hair care line adds, “We follow the conventions of the EU and other governmental bans on animal testing for cosmetics. Occasionally, laws and regulations require testing of certain materials outside of the cosmetics category on animals. Since the 1980s, Kao Corporation has been actively working with industry associations and relevant third parties to find robust alternatives to animal testing (many of which have been adopted as international guidelines for non-animal testing).”

John Frieda products are sold in China, which means that the brand is obliged to follow the laws of this particular country. China is known for conducting animal tests for imported beauty goods to guarantee that they are safe for humans. As such, John Frieda cannot claim to be entirely cruelty free. 

References:

Our Commitment

Beauty Without Bunnies

Leaping Bunny Approved Brands

Is Peter Thomas Roth Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Peter Thomas Roth is not cruelty free. The long answer: Peter Thomas Roth Clinical Skin Care aims to “find the best tools to combat acne, the many signs of aging, as well as protecting the skin from sun damage.” Since setting up his brand in 1993, Roth’s mission was to combine Read More...

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The short answer: No, Peter Thomas Roth is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Peter Thomas Roth Clinical Skin Care aims to “find the best tools to combat acne, the many signs of aging, as well as protecting the skin from sun damage.” Since setting up his brand in 1993, Roth’s mission was to combine effective and potent ingredients inspired by his Hungarian upbringing with advanced technology. It was created to cater to multiple skin care needs, covering all skin types and addressing all skin care concerns. At present, Peter Thomas Roth Clinical Skin Care sells over 100 products worldwide. 

On their official website, the company reveals, “Peter Thomas Roth does not test any of our formulas or raw materials on animals but we believe in total transparency and will not claim that for the following reasons:

  1. We cannot be certain that a raw material supplier has not now or at some time in the past tested an ingredient on animals. We do not knowingly purchase ingredients that have been tested on animals and inquire before purchasing ingredients but some staple ingredients that have been used in products for years may have been tested on animals in the past.
  2. We do sell our products in China and some other countries that still do tests on animals; though it is our understanding that China is moving towards stopping this practice. We are not alone in selling to China; nearly every major cosmetic company sells there. Also to be noted are that many major beauty retailers conduct business there including QVC and Sephora.”

Until Peter Thomas Roth stops selling in China and other countries that continue to do animal testing, they cannot be considered cruelty free. 

References:

About Us

FAQs

Beauty Without Bunnies: Peter Thomas Roth

Cruelty Free Kitty: Peter Thomas Roth

Is Herbal Essences Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Herbal Essences is not cruelty free. The long answer: Herbal Essences is a line of hair care products by Procter & Gamble—a company that also distributes Aussie and Pantene. It is endorsed by PETA as a cruelty-free brand. The brand shares, “Cruelty free means that our products and ingredients will not Read More...

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The short answer: No, Herbal Essences is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Herbal Essences is a line of hair care products by Procter & Gamble—a company that also distributes Aussie and Pantene. It is endorsed by PETA as a cruelty-free brand. The brand shares, “Cruelty free means that our products and ingredients will not be tested on animals. Herbal Essences is proud and excited to be recognized by PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, as a cruelty free brand.”

Despite the recognition from PETA, Herbal Essences sells its hair care products in China. China is known for having mandatory laws that require imported beauty products to undergo animal testing before being released in the country. Animal tests can also be done when a customer complains about a certain hair product. Until China changes its import policies or Herbal Essences stops selling in China, it cannot claim to be 100% cruelty free.  

References:

Herbal Essences: PETA cruelty free brand

Beauty Without Bunnies: Herbal Essences

Leaping Bunny Approved Brands 

Is Clean & Clear Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Clean & Clear is not entirely cruelty free. The long answer: Clean & Clear is a brand known for producing dermatologist-approved skin care products. It is manufactured and distributed by the American consumer goods and pharmaceutical company, Johnson & Johnson. On their official website, they answer the question: Do you test Read More...

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The short answer: No, Clean & Clear is not entirely cruelty free.

The long answer: Clean & Clear is a brand known for producing dermatologist-approved skin care products. It is manufactured and distributed by the American consumer goods and pharmaceutical company, Johnson & Johnson.

On their official website, they answer the question: Do you test your products on animals? The brand states, “We want you to feel good about how we make Clean & Clear products. You can only do that if you have the facts. The fact is, Clean & Clear doesn’t conduct animal testing of our cosmetic products anywhere in the world, except in the rare situation where governments or laws require it. At Clean & Clear, we won’t ever compromise on the quality or safety of our products or stop seeking alternatives to animal testing.”

Just like other J&J brands AVEENO and Neutrogena, Clean & Clear is also available in China. And that is the reason why they needed to include the phrase “except in the rare situation where governments or laws require it” in their testing policy. Imported skin care products are obligated by Chinese law to undergo testing, which are sadly done on animals. Plus, their products can go through testing when a customer files a complaint. 

Until Clean & Clear stops selling their products in China or China changes their regulations, the brand cannot claim to be 100% cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Clean & Clear

Clean & Clear Animal Testing Policy

Is Clean & Clear Cruelty Free in 2020?

Clean & Clear

Is Pond’s Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Pond’s is not entirely cruelty free. The long answer: Pond’s is an American brand that began selling its infamous cream in 1846. The wonder product was invented by pharmacist Theron T. Pond. In 1987, British-Dutch company Unilever acquired Pond’s from Chesebrough Manufacturing Company. It is now sold alongside skin care lines Read More...

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The short answer: No, Pond’s is not entirely cruelty free.

The long answer: Pond’s is an American brand that began selling its infamous cream in 1846. The wonder product was invented by pharmacist Theron T. Pond. In 1987, British-Dutch company Unilever acquired Pond’s from Chesebrough Manufacturing Company. It is now sold alongside skin care lines Vaseline and St. Ives (a cruelty free brand!). On its Philippine website, Pond’s reveals whether they test their products on animals. The brand states, “Pond’s uses a wide range of non-animal approaches to assess the safety of its products for consumers, and Pond’s does not test our products on animals.” 

However, both Cruelty Free Kitty and Cruelty Free Collections report that Pond’s is sold in China. The country requires skin care products manufactured abroad to undergo mandatory tests. The brand’s products are tested on animals to guarantee they are safe for human use. As such, Pond’s cannot be considered a cruelty-free brand until they stop selling in China or until the Chinese government changes its import policies.

References:

Pond’s FAQs

Is Ponds Cruelty-Free in 2020? SHM Answers!

Cruelty Free Kitty: Ponds

Is Ponds Cruelty-Free in 2020?

Is Max Factor Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Max Factor is not cruelty free. The long answer: Max Factor is a cosmetics brand from Coty, Inc. It was founded by Polish beautician Maksymilian Faktorowicz in 1909 as Max Factor & Company. By 1991, it was purchased by American multinational consumer goods corporation Procter & Gamble. In 2016, Coty Inc. Read More...

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The short answer: No, Max Factor is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Max Factor is a cosmetics brand from Coty, Inc. It was founded by Polish beautician Maksymilian Faktorowicz in 1909 as Max Factor & Company. By 1991, it was purchased by American multinational consumer goods corporation Procter & Gamble. In 2016, Coty Inc. acquired Max Factor from P&G. Coty Inc. is one of the largest beauty and fragrance companies in the world and is also known for also distributing CoverGirl.

Max Factor’s official website does not post anything about their stance on animal testing. However, their parent company Coty Inc. reveals, “At Coty, we do not test our products on animals and are committed to ending animal testing across the beauty industry. All our products are safe and have been developed, manufactured and packaged in compliance with the laws, regulations and guidelines that are applicable in each country in which we sell them. Some governments or agencies stipulate the testing of finished products on animals in accordance with local legal and regulatory requirements. Coty has formed a strategic partnership with Cruelty Free International (CFI), the leading organization working to end animal testing for cosmetics globally, and so far, has achieved Leaping Bunny Certification for COVERGIRL.”

Currently, Max Factor is sold in China. To be able to break into the Chinese market, Max Factor must follow the country’s importation laws, which includes testing products on animals. Though Max Factor is not doing the tests themselves, the brand has allowed Chinese authorities and third parties to do so on their behalf. Testing can also be done randomly or when a customer complains about their product. Given these facts, Max Factor cannot be considered a cruelty-free cosmetic line.

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Max Factor

Coty Inc.

Is Max Factor Cruelty Free in 2020?

Cruelty Free Kitty: Max Factor

Is TRESemmé Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, TRESemmé is not cruelty free. The long answer: TRESemmé is an American hair care brand founded in 1947 by the Godefroy Manufacturing Company. It was named after the cosmetologist and hair care expert, Edna L. Emme. In 2010, it was bought by Unilever, which also produces and distributes Vaseline and St. Read More...

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The short answer: No, TRESemmé is not cruelty free.

The long answer: TRESemmé is an American hair care brand founded in 1947 by the Godefroy Manufacturing Company. It was named after the cosmetologist and hair care expert, Edna L. Emme. In 2010, it was bought by Unilever, which also produces and distributes Vaseline and St. Ives

On its UK website, TRESemmé reveals their stance on animal testing: “TRESemmé is committed to eliminating animal testing across the business. Since the 1980s, TRESemmé has remained at the forefront of research into non-animal approaches to assess product safety and advocates effective, science-based regulation on alternatives to animal testing that ensure consumer safety and facilitate innovation.”

The brand adds, “TRESemmé scientists play a leading role internationally, working with key academic, government and NGO scientists to lead the development and application of non-animal tested approaches for assessing consumer safety. Where we are legally obliged to commission animal studies, we ensure a minimal number of animals are used.” They also state that “no animal testing is carried out in our own laboratories. In countries where local authorities test our products on animals, we are working with government scientists to help implement non animal-based methods.”

TRESemmé is available in China, a country that requires imported hair care products to undergo testing on animals. These experiments are done before the products can be sold in the country, or even after if a customer complains about a certain product. Despite their valiant efforts to find alternative ways to guarantee product safety, the hair care brand cannot be considered cruelty free if they allow China to test their products on animals.

References:

TRESemmé

Cruelty Free Kitty: TRESemmé

Is TRESemmé Cruelty Free in 2020?

Is Redken Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Redken is not entirely cruelty free. The long answer: An American hair care brand, Redken offers professional hair care and styling products for different hair types. It was founded in 1960 by American actress Paula Kent and her hairdresser Jheri Redding. Currently, the brand is owned by the L’Oréal Group, which Read More...

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The short answer: No, Redken is not entirely cruelty free.

The long answer: An American hair care brand, Redken offers professional hair care and styling products for different hair types. It was founded in 1960 by American actress Paula Kent and her hairdresser Jheri Redding.

Currently, the brand is owned by the L’Oréal Group, which claims it has been against animal testing for over 30 years. On its official website, Redken shares, “L’Oréal, the parent company of Redken, no longer tests any of its products or any of its ingredients on animals, anywhere in the world nor does L’Oréal delegate this task to others. An exception could only be made if regulatory authorities demanded it for safety or regulatory purposes.”

Redken products are available in professional beauty salons in over 50 countries. This includes China, where imported beauty products undergo compulsory testing on animals. Experiments by third parties may be done before or after the items have been approved for distribution by the Chinese government. As such, Redken cannot be considered a cruelty-free brand. 

References:

FAQ

Beauty Without Bunnies: Redken (L’Oreal)

Leaping Bunny Approved Brands 

Cruelty Free Kitty: Redken

Our alternative methods to animal testing

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