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Category: Guides

How to Tell If Your Cat is Pregnant [7 Ways to Find Out]

Did you know that unspayed female cats can get pregnant as soon as they turn four to six months old? They are known to be “induced ovulators,” releasing eggs due to external stimuli such as the physical act of mating or mechanical stimulation. A female cat can go into heat every two to three weeks Read More...

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Did you know that unspayed female cats can get pregnant as soon as they turn four to six months old? They are known to be “induced ovulators,” releasing eggs due to external stimuli such as the physical act of mating or mechanical stimulation. A female cat can go into heat every two to three weeks from spring to early fall, with her gestation period lasting around three months (63 to 65 days). 

If you suspect that your unspayed cat is pregnant, there are 7 ways to confirm her state. However, you won’t be able to see these marked changes until two to three weeks after she procreates:

1 Her nipples are enlarged and pinkish in colour.

Also called “pinking up,” your cat’s nipples have changed from their usual colour and turned pink or red. The nipples have noticeably grown in size, and sometimes, the hair around them have lessened to give clearer access to milk feeding.

2 Your cat is experiencing morning sickness.

Whether it’s puking what she eats or a marked lack of appetite, some cats may experience morning sickness during the first few weeks of their pregnancy. The changes in her uterus as well as the surge of hormones may cause her to feel exhausted and sleep longer. 

3 She has a larger tummy and a swayback posture.

Starting around the fifth week of pregnancy, your cat’s tummy will become unmistakably round until it’s time for her to give birth to her litter. Due to the added ball-shaped weight in her belly, her spine may bend, causing the back to sink and develop the “mule look.”  

4 Her body weight and appetite have increased. 

Pregnant cats carry an average of four kittens in one litter, so it’s no surprise that her intake of food will increase by 50 percent. She should be fed specialised, high-quality pregnant cat food rich in protein, vitamins, and omega-6 that will nourish the growing kittens in her belly. Unsurprisingly, she will also gain two to four pounds throughout the course of her pregnancy.

5 She becomes extra affectionate or territorial.

Changing moods can also be a sign of pregnancy in female cats. Some cats become more affectionate, while others turn into highly territorial creatures. If she frequently purrs and seeks out your attention, be sure to reciprocate her actions. If she becomes distant toward you (or even your other pets), give her the space she wants while making sure her needs are being met.  

6 Your cat is queening.

Queening is the term for cats about to go into labor. During this time (around two weeks before her due date), your cat searches for a comfortable place where she can give birth. Help her secure a safe, quiet, and warm place inside your house. More importantly, be ready to provide her with a birthing box filled with shredded newspaper, blankets, or towels. To encourage your cat to sleep in it, place her drinking and feeding dishes and litter box next to it. 

7 Take her to the veterinarian.

Confirm your cat is pregnant by taking her to the veterinarian for an ultrasound (to see if she’s really pregnant) or an X-ray (to discover how many kittens to expect). Note that viruses may be passed on to unborn kittens, so make sure your pet’s vaccinations are up to date. Discuss what special considerations need to be taken, so that your cat may be relaxed and comfortable throughout her gestation. 

When your cat goes into nesting mode, take her to the vet once more to make sure everything is in order. Get advice on pre- and post-delivery procedures, as well as what to do in case emergencies arise. Two telltale signs that your cat is ready to give birth is that she stops eating for 24 hours, and her temperature drops below 100°F.

In conclusion

Unless unavoidable, have your kitten spayed before her first heat or before she reaches five months of age. Spaying prevents unnecessary births (cats can have four litters per year, so just imagine taking care of all those kittens!) as well as the possibility of uterine infections and breast tumors. Consult with your veterinarian about the best time to have her spay surgery. If your kitten is still too young to be spayed, keep her safely indoors. That will reduce the risk of unwanted interaction with male cats. 

To discover more about what it takes to adopt a cat, we’ve got all the information you need right here. You can also read more cat-related guides and adoption stories on our blog. 

Why do cats hiss? [9 possible reasons why cats hiss]

Have you ever witnessed a cat hissing at you and scaring the hell out of you? Cats hiss due to a variety of reasons, and in this Waldo’s Friends article, we’ll get to the bottom of all the likely causes. But first… What is a cat hiss? How does it look or sound when a Read More...

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Have you ever witnessed a cat hissing at you and scaring the hell out of you? Cats hiss due to a variety of reasons, and in this Waldo’s Friends article, we’ll get to the bottom of all the likely causes. But first…

What is a cat hiss?

A hiss is described by Merriam-Webster as a sharp sibilant sound, usually made to express disapproval. When a cat hisses, it is usually misinterpreted as a sign of aggression. But in reality, it is a normal feline gesture that helps her express her uncomfortable feelings. Feline behaviour experts believe that cats have developed creating this spine-tingling sound by imitating the deadly, distinctive noise that snakes emit. 

How does it look or sound when a cat hisses?

When a cat hisses, expect to hear a sound similar to a radiator on overload. Her mouth would usually be positioned into a sneer and her tongue curled into a U-shape. Her ears would either be flattened or positioned backwards, and accompanied by an arched back and/or a poofy tail. (You can watch this compilation video of cats hissing here.) 

Why do cats hiss?

As mentioned earlier, cats hiss to express their uncomfortable feelings. This may be due to any of the following reasons:

1 A cat hisses when she feels threatened.

Fear is the primary driving force that makes cats hiss. The hiss acts as a warning sound against people (or even inanimate objects) that threaten her. If they don’t back away, she may resort to attacking them. Some cats hiss when they are handled roughly or when they are restrained, such as when they are being handled, poked, or prodded at the veterinarian.  

2 A cat hisses when she comes across an unfamiliar animal.

Dr. Marci Koski of Feline Behavior Solutions says that cats go on the defense by hissing at other animals and warning them to stay away. Hissing is also a common intimidation tactic used by male cats who are in search of mates. But this doesn’t automatically mean that the hissing cat would be the one initiating the attack. In fact, it’s usually the other way around! 

3 A cat hisses when she’s hurt. 

A cat may hiss at a person who touches her sensitive body part. If you know your cat is injured or has arthritis, take note of when she hisses at you while you’re petting or carrying her. That way, you can refrain from holding that particular area. You can also bring her to the vet to have that specific part checked.  

4 A cat hisses to protect her kittens.  

Female cats that have just given birth may display protectiveness by hissing at people or animals who get too close to their kittens. Even the most amiable cats may hiss at her humans to stay away. 

5 A cat hisses when she’s playing.

A play hiss is a shorter hissing sound commonly made by kittens. The sound is produced when a kitten gets surprised by a playmate, or when her littermates become too rough while playing. 

6 A cat hisses when she is surprised.

Similar to kittens, a cat may hiss when she gets shocked by sudden, loud noises or quick, unexpected movements. Anything that causes surprise or stress may lead her to hiss. 

7 A cat hisses when she encounters something new or unfamiliar. 

Cats are not keen on change, so it’s no surprise that they would hiss at something new or unfamiliar to them. These may include total strangers, novel environments (such as moving into a new home or being left at an animal shelter), or even a paw sibling that just came back from the vet and smells completely different.   

8 A cat hisses to express her annoyance.

Don’t be surprised when your cat hisses at you when she’s not in the mood to play, when she doesn’t want to do something in particular (like teeth or hair brushing), or when you deny her of a treat. Hissing may also be done towards a person who teases her mercilessly.  

9 A cat hisses because she is undersocialised.

Aside from kittens who are still learning “how to cat,” older felines who are not used to being around other people or animals may be more prone to hissing. 

What should you do if a cat hisses at you?

Whenever a cat hisses, it’s best to give her the space and time to cool off. Going closer to her as she hisses would only increase her stress levels, and also up the chances of you getting hurt if she lashes out. If a cat hisses while you’re petting her, stop what you’re doing and simply let her go. Allow her to hide in her safe nook, and give her the chance to approach you in her own time. Don’t reprimand her or stare directly at her so you don’t agitate her. 

To recap

Cat hissing is a common feline behaviour that you shouldn’t be afraid of. If you are bothered by her hissing, determine the cause and find solutions to decrease it. If the hissing is caused by pain, bring her to a veterinarian immediately. 

Thinking of adopting a kitten or cat from a shelter? We’ve got all the things you need to know and the details you need to make it happen. You can also read up on more informative cat-related guides and inspiring cat foster or adoption tales here.

How to remove ticks on your dog

If you like taking your dog on walks in grassy or wooded areas, there’s a higher chance that you’re exposing him to tick contamination. Ticks are commonly found in moist bushland such as parks and gardens. There are about 70 different tick species in Australia, with the most common one in the East Coast being Read More...

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If you like taking your dog on walks in grassy or wooded areas, there’s a higher chance that you’re exposing him to tick contamination. Ticks are commonly found in moist bushland such as parks and gardens. There are about 70 different tick species in Australia, with the most common one in the East Coast being the paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus).  

In this article, you’ll discover: 

What are ticks?

Typically 3 to 5 mm long, ticks are tiny parasites with eight legs. Their flat, oval-shaped bodies swell as they feed on the blood of creatures such as dogs and humans. A tick attaches to a host by piercing its mouthparts in soft areas. 

In dogs, ticks can be usually found attached on a canine’s skin around the face and neck, inside their ears, underneath their arms and legs, or in between their toes. Your dog might not even realize that he has ticks on him because these parasites do not cause him to itch unlike fleas. But once they’re removed, the bitten areas might become red, inflamed, and itchy. Aside from these skin irritations, tick bites can also cause allergic reactions.

What happens if your dog has ticks?

Ticks can transmit diseases such as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. If your dog gets bitten by a tick which carries Lyme disease, he may exhibit lethargy, loss of appetite, fever, lameness, and swollen lymph nodes. On the other hand, if he transmits Rocky Mountain spotted fever, he may have a decrease in appetite, muscle or joint pain, fever, coughing, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, or swelling of the face or legs. 

It can take a tick as fast as three to 24 hours of feeding to infect your dog (or even you!) with various diseases. These parasites usually detach on their own after they feed, but that can take days, which increases the risk of infection for you and your family. 

How can you tell if your dog has ticks?

After taking a walk outside the park, garden, or grassy trail, be sure to do a quick body scan on your dog to look for ticks that may be latched onto his skin. That way, you don’t bring these tiny parasites into your home. Gently run your fingers through his entire body to feel if there are any unusual bumps present. Carefully go over his face, neck, ears, arms, legs, and toes. Part his fur in the area where you feel a bump. It can be as small as a pinhead or as big as a grape. Check to see if there is a black, brown, or a gray brown coloured bug attached.

What do you need to remove ticks off your dog?

If you find a tick attached to your dog, you can opt to remove it on your own. However, you should do it with the proper equipment on hand: 

  • Latex or rubber gloves
  • A strong light source 
  • Magnifying glass
  • Fine-tipped tweezers or a tick removal tool
  • Container with secure lid
  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Triple antibiotic ointment
  • Dog treats

Never attempt to remove or crush ticks using your fingers because the diseases they carry may be passed on to you. The gloves will work as a protective barrier against this possibility. As for the tweezers or tick removal tool, these will help you safely remove the entire body of the tick and not leave any infectious remnants on your dog.  

A tick removal tool can safely twist and dislodge the parasite from your dog’s fur. In Australia, you can purchase tick removal tools such as Tick Ease and Tick Twister.

Tick Ease comes with two sides: a thin tweezer tip and a slotted scoop

Tick Twister comes as a set with two hook sizes 

How can you remove ticks off your dog?

Follow this step-by-step procedure to safely remove ticks off your dog.

  1. Wear a pair of gloves.
  2. Comfortably position your dog in a well-lit area or use a strong light source and magnifying glass to help you see the tick better.
  3. Ask someone to help you distract the dog by holding it and feeding it with treats.
  4. If you’re using a tweezer: 
    • Grab the base of the tick as close to your dog’s skin as possible without pinching your dog. Do not squeeze the tick too tightly, so you don’t end up crushing it. 
    • Pull the tick out from your dog’s skin in a steady motion without twisting or jerking your hand. Carefully pull the tick’s head out of your dog’s skin while still attached to its body.
  5. If you’re using a tick removal tool: 
    • Place the tool’s hook under the tick’s body. 
    • Rotate the tool in one direction and wait until the tick detaches from your dog’s skin.
    • Once detached, remove the tick away from your dog.
  6. Check your dog’s skin. Make sure you have removed the tick’s entire head and body.
  7. Place the tick inside a jar with isopropyl alcohol and cover it with a lid. Keep it in case your dog develops any sicknesses in the next few days. If this happens, give it to your veterinarian for examination.
  8. Disinfect your dog’s skin and apply triple antibiotic ointment. 
  9. Reward your dog with a treat. 

Be careful when you try to remove ticks near your dog’s eyes and mouth, or inside his ear canal. If you’re not confident about removing a tick, it is advisable to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian and have it removed. If the tick’s head gets stuck in your dog’s skin, do not try to remove it by force or skin irritation and inflammation might occur. Your best course of action would be to see the vet. 

In conclusion

Now that you’ve read up on how to get ticks off dogs, know that the best line of defense would be to protect your dog from future tick infestations. You can do so by always checking his body after he goes out, or opting to use preventative tick treatments such as tablets, collars, and spot-ons. Some tick collars repel and kill parasites, while others flow through the bloodstream and are killed once they feed on your dog. Consult with your veterinarian to find the best preventative tick product that suits your dog.

Learn how to get rid of your dog’s fleas or practice grooming him at home, such as giving him a bath and clipping his nails. For more dog-related articles, click here

What is reverse sneezing in dogs?

Have you ever witnessed your dog creating a snorting sound while appearing to inhale and sneeze at the same time? Don’t worry! He’s just reverse sneezing, which is a condition that’s fairly common in dogs but rarely seen in cats. If you’ve never seen a dog reverse sneezing, check out this video by Dr Aimee Read More...

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Have you ever witnessed your dog creating a snorting sound while appearing to inhale and sneeze at the same time? Don’t worry! He’s just reverse sneezing, which is a condition that’s fairly common in dogs but rarely seen in cats.

If you’ve never seen a dog reverse sneezing, check out this video by Dr Aimee Johnson to see what happens:

Here are the top three things you need to know about your dog’s reverse sneezing:

What is reverse sneezing?

Also called backwards sneezing or inspiratory paroxysmal respiration, reverse sneezing happens when a dog makes rapid and long inspirations, stands still, and extends his head and neck. A dog produces loud and distinct snorts while reverse sneezing a few times in a row for about 5 to 10 seconds.  

When you find your dog reverse sneezing occasionally, you shouldn’t get stressed over it. The episode is not harmful nor will it produce any side effects. 

What causes reverse sneezing in dogs?

Akin to the regular way of sneezing, reverse sneezing is done to force out something that may be irritating your dog’s respiratory tract⁠—from his nose to his sinus, to the back of his throat and nasopharynx. Irritants may include allergies, infections, secretions, foreign materials (e.g. seeds, pollens, or grasses), smoke, odours, dust, and masses. 

Nasal mites may also cause a dog to reverse sneeze. These are small parasites that live in dogs’ nasal passages and sinuses, which are transmitted from direct and indirect contact between dogs or from a contaminated area. 

Dogs with brachycephalic skulls (that tend to have elongated soft palates), long noses and narrow nasal passages, or those with anatomical abnormalities are said to be more afflicted with reverse sneezing than other dogs.

How is reverse sneezing treated?

When your dog goes through a reverse sneezing episode, there is no need to rush to the vet. You can help your dog out by softly blowing in his face, gently massaging his neck area, and covering his nostrils for a few seconds. 

However, if your dog is suffering from bouts of these more than usual, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. Observe the causes and  try to capture your dog on video so you can show it to the vet during his next medical checkup. Your vet will go through your canine’s medical history and perform a complete physical examination, paying close attention to the respiratory tract and mouth. Rhinoscopy, blood and urine tests, and nasal or dental X-rays may also be administered to see what might be bothering your dog’s respiratory system. 

Your vet can easily remove foreign materials found within your dog’s respiratory system. However, masses and anatomical abnormalities may only be corrected through surgery. If the vet suspects that your dog has nasal mites, he might perform nasal flushing to obtain and examine the fluid from your pet’s nasal passages. When mites are found, antiparasitic medication may be given over the course of a few weeks to eliminate them. If your dog’s reverse sneezing is triggered by allergies or infection, he may be given antihistamine or anti-inflammatory medication to reduce the episodes. 

In conclusion

Depending on your dog’s anatomical structure, respiratory sensitivity, and exposure to nasal irritants, he may go through a number of reverse sneezing episodes in his lifetime. When this happens, just carefully watch over him and comfort him afterwards. But if there is a marked increase in his reverse sneezing episodes, schedule a visit to your veterinarian immediately. 

If you’re curious to read up on other intriguing canine-themed topics, click here. You can also learn which human foods are safe for your dog. 

6 Reasons Why Your Cat Licks Your Hair

Some cats exhibit unusual behaviour such as choosing to approach a person on her own terms, scratching furniture, and licking her human’s hair. If you’ve ever encountered the last scenario, have you ever stopped and wondered, “Is there a reason why my cat enjoys licking my hair?”  We got to the bottom of things and Read More...

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Some cats exhibit unusual behaviour such as choosing to approach a person on her own terms, scratching furniture, and licking her human’s hair. If you’ve ever encountered the last scenario, have you ever stopped and wondered, “Is there a reason why my cat enjoys licking my hair?” 

We got to the bottom of things and discovered all the possible reasons why your cat licks your locks. It could be any (or all!) of the following: 

1 Your cat is grooming you.

A cat’s tongue is covered with tiny, curved, and hollow-tipped spines that can transfer large amounts of saliva from her mouth to her fur. Your cat uses her tongue to clean her skin and fur, lowering her body’s temperature through the evaporation of her saliva. Cats rely on other feline companions to help them lick hard-to-reach areas like their faces, ears, and the tops of their heads.

In general, familial cats groom each other as a gesture of affection. Experts refer to this as allogrooming, which is both a social and bonding behaviour between related or friendly cats. If she extends this grooming habit to you, she considers you as family and wants you to know how much she loves you. Your hair is the closest thing you have to fur, so it’s no surprise that she’d target licking specific areas such as the top of the head, the edge of the hair tips, the beard, and even the eyebrows. As she welcomes you into her inner circle through licking, your cat could also be attempting to teach you how to groom yourself—just like her mother taught her as a kitten.  

2 Your cat wants your attention.

Similar to biting, licking may simply be your cat’s way of telling you to pay attention to her. If she’s done it a few times before and received a pat on the head or a cooing sound from you, she’s likely to do the same action over and over again. 

3 Your cat is marking her territory.

Cats who belong to one family smell the same way because of the scent they release through licking. This helps them instantly identify one another, and makes them feel comfortable with their surroundings. If you own more than one cat (or there are many cats in your neighbourhood), the cat who loves licking your hair may be trying to show others that she “owns” you. She may be using her scent to intimidate or chase other cats away.  

4 Your cat enjoys the taste or smell of your hair. 

Some feline pets love the smell and taste of your hair’s natural oils or your hair products. You can test this theory by changing the hair care products you use, and seeing how she reacts to them. If you want to lessen your cat’s licking habit, choose shampoo with cat-repellent scents such as lavender, citronella, peppermint, and lemongrass. Also, be wary about letting the cat lick your hair if you’re using a strong hair product such as dandruff shampoo that might be toxic for her. 

5 Your cat wants to relieve your stress.

Cats are attuned to their owners’ emotions. When you’re feeling low or under the weather, your cat may suddenly become more attentive and lick you to help you feel better. It’s comparable to the way they lick one another to calm themselves.  

6 Your cat may be anxious.

If your cat suddenly gets into the habit of licking your hair and other objects more than usual, it may be something that should be looked into especially if it starts to affect her day-to-day life. Schedule a visit to her veterinarian so you can rule out any medical issues and discuss possible reasons for the unusual amount of licking. Remove the possible stressors and see if her behaviour improves. If the behaviour persists, book an appointment with an animal behaviourist to treat it accordingly. 

What to do if you don’t enjoy being licked

Not all cat pawrents find hair licking an enjoyable experience. If you do not prefer your tresses to be licked, you can calmly distract your cat by providing her with other oral outlets like a fuzzy toy or a food-dispensing puzzle. Stand up and leave without shouting at her or reprimanding her for her actions. 

Final thoughts

Licking is a completely normal cat activity that may extend to the hair of a kitty’s favourite human. Cat behaviourist Pam Johnson-Bennett says that “the stronger the bond you have with your cat, the more likely it’s going to happen,” so you should take it as a compliment the next time it occurs. 

If you’re considering adopting a rescue cat (and would love to discover all her feline quirks), we have all the information you need right here. You can also read more cat-related guides and adoption stories on our blog.

10 Ways to Help Your Anxious Dog

Do you care for or own an anxious dog? Just like humans, our pets can and will experience anxiety at different points in their lives. When this happens, they sometimes have a harder time communicating their feelings to us. We can also misinterpret their behaviour and miss the opportunity to help them out. In this Read More...

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Do you care for or own an anxious dog? Just like humans, our pets can and will experience anxiety at different points in their lives. When this happens, they sometimes have a harder time communicating their feelings to us. We can also misinterpret their behaviour and miss the opportunity to help them out.

In this Waldo’s Friends article, we tackle:

What is dog anxiety?

Anxiety is “the mind and body’s reaction to stressful, dangerous, or unfamiliar situations.” A dog can manifest anxiety when he is exposed to high-stress scenarios, visual stimuli, or major life changes. These include:

  • Being abandoned, abused, or neglected by his owner
  • Being placed in a high-stress environment with poor care and several animals 
  • Traveling or moving to another place
  • Being left home alone
  • Experiencing a change in family dynamic, routine, and/or lifestyle
  • Being separated from loved ones
  • Hearing loud noises such as fireworks and thunderstorms
  • Being exposed to unfamiliar people or animals
  • Getting older and experiencing a decline in perception, memory, learning, and awareness

How does a dog manifest anxiety? 

According to Dr. Susan Konecny of Best Friends Animal Society, these are the common clinical signs to look out for: pacing, trembling, shaking, hypervigilance, lip licking, frequent yawning, and decreased appetite. Aside from these clinical signs, Konecny also shares physiological effects such as increased salivation or drooling, increased heart rate and panting, dilated pupils, skin lesions brought about by self-trauma, and overgrooming.

Central California SPCA also states that anxiety may be expressed in different ways depending on your pet’s personality. Some dogs will continuously whine, howl, and bark, while others will shiver and whimper when experiencing stressful situations. Overly anxious pets even become problematic when they turn into hostile pooches that cause destruction or end up uncontrollably peeing and pooping all over the place.

To the untrained eye, anxiety may simply look like your dog is misbehaving. However, if your pup frequently exhibits these signs, you need to observe when they occur and schedule a visit with your veterinarian. Inform your vet about what you’ve observed, and let her check your dog for any undiagnosed medical issues. If your pooch’s anxiety is caused by an underlying medical problem, this should lessen or disappear as soon as the treatment is carried out. 

If your dog shows increasing bouts of anxiety, you might also want to consider going to an animal behaviourist or dog trainer who specialises in helping anxious dogs so the issue can be dealt with in a positive way. Know that his anxiety can mostly be treated and cured, and if not – it can be managed with a few lifestyle changes. If your dog’s long-term anxiety is not addressed correctly, he may lose his appetite or withdraw from others or cause harm within his community.   

How can you help your anxious dog? 

With every instance of dog anxiety, you should take a moment to figure out what caused it then determine the right course of action to reduce or eliminate it. There are general ways to help ease your dog’s anxiety:

1 Shower him with love.

The fastest way to show your dog you care is by giving him a hug, stroking his fur, or petting him. Giving your pup a massage will also work wonders in easing his tensed muscles and calming his nerves. Do it by starting in his neck area, then working your way downward while applying gentle but firm strokes. Remember to respect your dog’s boundaries even as you display such positive environmental reinforcements. Allow him to receive your affections in his own way and open up at a pace that he is comfortable with. Resist the urge to treat your dog like an infant and hugging and kissing him without warning. Doing this may increase his anxiety and backfire.

2 Regularly exercise your dog.

More than just keeping your dog physically and mentally stimulated, daily exercise is known to reduce anxiety-related behavioural problems. Greater levels of physical exertion will boost the endorphins in his body while strengthening your bond.  Remember to pay attention to the kind of environment your dog is comfortable exercising in. This can be a low traffic on leash park or even just your backyard. 

3 Provide him with a safe space. 

If your dog gets agitated by sudden noise or unfamiliar people, you can place him in a room or in a quiet part of the house that eliminates these stressors. You can play classical music, nature sounds, or white noise, spray synthetic calming pheromones, and use low lighting to help him relax. 

If you don’t have a safe room that isn’t heavily frequented by others in the house, you can also get him a specialised crate that’s specially designed for dogs with anxiety. The easy-to-assemble, motion-activated ZenCrate is known to provide vibration isolation, noise cancellation, and reduced light. It can even be pre-programmed to play soothing music.

ZenCrate

4 Remove his triggers. 

Once you’ve determined what makes your dog anxious, it’s always best to limit his interaction with these elements and observe if his disposition improves. For example, anxious dogs who do not deal well with strangers should be walked in areas with minimal people, or taken out during off-peak times when pedestrians and cars are hardly around. Do not be embarrassed to advocate for your dog when faced with people who refuse to back off or respect your boundaries. If a dog runs up to yours, use your body to create a safe blocker for your dog before your dog has a chance to react to this unwelcome intrusion. 

Ask other dog owners who are not following leash walking park rules to call their dogs away from yours. If your dog is very reactive due to anxiety around very specific triggers, simply stay vigilant and change course the second you spot the trigger approaching. This can be kids who scream at your dog or want to hug him without permission or other dogs who are off leash in a narrow sidewalk.

5 Make his situation known.

If your anxious dog must interact with others, let other people know about his sensitive state by letting him wear a “nervous” bandana or vest. This way, fellow pet owners and pedestrians can instantly see that it’s better to keep their distance from your dog. Again, advocate for your dog by telling anyone closeby about the situation before anything occurs. For city dwellers this may mean asking strangers in lifts to not pet your dog without permission or park goers to keep away from off leash areas.

6 Entertain your pooch with interactive toys.

Dogs that experience separation anxiety can be distracted through puzzle toys that dispense treats when they are successfully unlocked. Not only will your dog be mentally stimulated and entertained by it, but he will also enjoy munching on his favourite treats.    

7 Let him wear a calming coat.

A calming coat supposedly decreases stress on a dog by constantly applying pressure on his torso. The pressure that will be felt by your canine is similar to the comforting way a parent swaddles his child. The coat is said to provide relief from separation anxiety, firework anxiety, noise anxiety, crating anxiety, travel anxiety, thunderstorms, and vet visits.

The Calming Coat 

8 Try to minimise the changes in his life. 

Changes in a dog’s regular routine, environment, home life, and lifestyle can cause anxiety. If you suddenly need to work longer hours, you may need to leave your dog with a sitter so he doesn’t experience separation anxiety. If he has lost his longtime animal companion, it might be good to consider adopting another dog to accompany him.  

9 Book a behaviour modification session with an experienced trainer. 

Don’t be ashamed to ask for professional help! By signing up your dog for behaviour modification, you can help alter his responses to offending triggers and stressful situations. Some of the most commonly applied techniques are habituation, response substitution, desensitisation, and counterconditioning. Thankfully there are several dog trainers who are experienced in positive reinforcement training for anxious and reactive dogs. Look for them in your community or ask your vet to recommend a service.

10 Put him on medication.

For dogs that suffer from extreme cases of anxiety, your veterinarian might consider letting him take antidepressants or CBD oil. Whatever the case, ask about the pros and cons of each type of medication, and find out its effects on your dog’s personality, moods, and life span. Medication and behaviour modification can go hand in hand in decreasing your dog’s anxiety.

We hope this article helps you become the best paw-rent or foster for your anxious dog! Click here to discover more canine-related guides from our blog.

How to introduce a kitten to a cat

Do you feel like it’s time to add another furry feline to your home? Before bringing home a kitten from the animal shelter or rescue centre, there are things you need to consider and prepare.  First and foremost, think about your existing cat. Cats are territorial by nature, so your cat (aka the master of Read More...

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Do you feel like it’s time to add another furry feline to your home? Before bringing home a kitten from the animal shelter or rescue centre, there are things you need to consider and prepare. 

First and foremost, think about your existing cat. Cats are territorial by nature, so your cat (aka the master of the house) may not readily accept the young kitty. Though some cats may quickly adjust to having new kittens around, others don’t and just end up barely tolerating them. The way your cat reacts to the new kitten greatly depends on how old and how well socialised your cat is when they meet. However, it doesn’t mean that you should leave everything to fate. There are ways to introduce a kitten to a cat to guarantee they’ll get off on the right paw, but you’ll need heaps of patience and sensitivity to succeed. 

This article will explain how anyone can introduce a cat to a kitten peacefully. It includes:

What to do before the kitten arrives

As much as possible, choose a kitten that has a similar personality as your cat. Though kittens are mostly playful and inquisitive around other new animals, it would help if the kitten you choose is of the opposite gender and matches the energy level and dominant traits of your cat

Prepare your cat for the new kitten’s arrival by making sure she is physically fit and mentally ready. Check for respiratory diseases and make sure her rabies shots are up to date (kittens are known to bring home these potential illnesses). Use pheromone diffusers, sprays, or wipes and consider feeding vet-approved nutritional supplements to put your cat in a calm state. 

Buy a new set of feeding bowls, collar, bed, toys, brush, litter box, and scratching post for your kitten. Your cat will not appreciate passing on her old stuff to the new pet, nor will the kitty appreciate getting hand-me-downs that smell like another cat. Place all the essentials within a secure, cat-proofed space with a closed door that the kitten can stay in for the time being. Make sure that this area is different and far from the existing area that your first cat owns.

Best practices for introducing a cat to a kitten

Take things very, very slow. When you finally bring the kitten home, take her directly to her designated space. Keep her there for at least a week, and do not allow her to leave the room anytime. 

Before proceeding with your introduction, make sure both cats are calm and relaxed. Do not let the cats see each other first until they’ve gotten used to each other’s scent. Start by letting them smell each other from their own side of the closed door. Feed them simultaneously, with the bowls placed several feet from the door. Gradually move the bowls closer to the door for every meal if both cats don’t show any hostility or uneasiness. Aside from letting them get used to each other’s scent as they eat, you can also try the scent transfer method. Wipe your resident cat’s mouth and cheeks with a sock and place it in the new kitten’s room. Do the same for the kitten, and put it in your cat’s area. 

After a week has passed, give your new kitten a chance to explore your home twice a day. Place your resident cat in another room, then open the door to let your new kitty learn about its new surroundings. Allow her the opportunity to look around as she deposits her scent around your home, and at the same time, familiarise herself with your cat’s smell. 

Put a pet gate or screen door so the cats can acquaint themselves with each other with a barrier between them. Feed them their favourite treats as they observe each other from a distance, so that they associate each other with positive emotions. Do this for a few seconds a number of times each day. 

You can also try introducing them to each other through interactive play. With the pet gate firmly in place, you and a companion can use a wand toy to simultaneously play with each cat on both sides. Do this for short periods of time, gradually increasing the amount of playtime if the cats do not display hostile reactions such as hissing, stalking, or hard staring. Reward their behaviour with treats. Once both cats are comfortable, you can let them play without a gate between them. As a precaution, you can let them wear leashes or harnesses, so that you can easily pull them apart if needed. 

Methods to maintain cat and kitten living together happily

Always make their interactions positive by showering each cat with praise, treats, and physical affection. Let your resident cat establish hierarchy with the new kitten by allowing her hiss, growl, or swat at the kitten whenever the latter does something she does not approve of. This is normal behaviour in which your cat tries to assert her dominance at home. 

It’s also important to keep the same routine your resident cat is used to even after the kitten arrives. Maintain her regular play, feed, and sleep times so you don’t add to the stress that she may already be feeling (more on this later!). Following a consistent schedule will also help your new kitten settle in. Make sure that your cat’s regular passageways to her usual sleeping spots, hangout areas, and litter box are still accessible even with the new pet around. 

What to do if the cats get aggressive towards each other

Not all feline introductions go smoothly. When your resident cat suddenly becomes aggressive towards your new kitty, you’ll need to restart the entire process and work on introducing them gradually. As mentioned earlier, do not rush things. This could take a few days or even weeks. 

You can prevent a cat fight from taking place. Control the space the two cats interact in so it limits their chances of chasing each other. Block and seal off areas such as underneath beds or couches, and open doors or passageways. You can also distract them by using a sight blocker (such as a hard piece of cardboard or blanket), clapping your hands loudly, or using a water squirter.  

How to tell if your cat isn’t reacting well to the kitten

Your cat can manifest the stress of having a new kitten around in different ways. Senior cats might start sleeping in unusual spots at home or display a marked decrease in appetite, which may lead to dehydration. Other cats may show territorial marking behaviours and eliminate in inappropriate areas. Some self-mutilate or groom to the point of hair loss, while others hide or become depressed. Excessive vocalisation, restlessness, and redirected aggression towards people or other pets can also be indications that she is feeling stressed. If your resident cat displays any unusual behaviour, it’s best to speak with your veterinarian or cat behaviourist and get advice on what you can do.

If you want to learn how to introduce a cat to a dog, read our comprehensive guide here. To discover more cat-related guides and adoption stories from Waldo’s Friends, click here.

All You Need to Know about Cat Harnesses

It’s best for domesticated cats to stay indoors. By remaining inside your home, these feline companions stay safe, live longer, and avoid dangerous hazards such as coming across wild animals, getting hit by a car, and transmitting infectious diseases. However, if you want your cat to be physically and mentally stimulated, there are ways to Read More...

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It’s best for domesticated cats to stay indoors. By remaining inside your home, these feline companions stay safe, live longer, and avoid dangerous hazards such as coming across wild animals, getting hit by a car, and transmitting infectious diseases. However, if you want your cat to be physically and mentally stimulated, there are ways to let her carefully experience the great outdoors! You can create a catio in your backyard or balcony (read our guide here!), or better yet, take her for a walk outside while sporting a secure yet comfortable cat harness. Walking outside gives your cat a chance to experience new sights, sounds, and smells while bonding with you in a unique but safe way. 

To help you get started on an outdoor adventure with your cat bestie, we’ve put together the following for you to read and practise:

What is a cat harness?

A cat harness is a set of straps and fittings specifically made for feline pets. A pet harness is defined by Wikipedia as “equipment consisting of straps of webbing that loop nearly around—that fasten together using side release buckles—the torso of an animal.” 

Meant to control your cat’s movement, cat harnesses are typically made with adjustable straps and come in a wide array of styles, sizes, and colours. A leash can be attached to the body strap or on a D ring that rests between the shoulders. 

Why do you need a cat harness?

If you plan on walking your cat on a leash, you must attach it to a cat harness rather than a cat collar. Cats have soft throats, and if you tug on the leash attached to her collar, you may damage your pet’s throat or block her air passageway. Harnesses are also the best option since they are wiggle proof and go securely around your cat’s body.

Aside from using it for cat walks and hikes, you can use a harness if your cat dislikes using carriers in general. For long distance road trips, you can use the harness to let your cat out of her carrier and stretch her legs safely. 

What are the types of cat harnesses?

Pawrents keen on taking their cats on outdoor walks can choose from three kinds of harnesses, namely:

H-style harness 

When unbuckled, the straps form the letter H. There are two adjustable straps that go around the cat’s neck and waist, then another strap that connects the two. Your cat will have a hard time wiggling out of the H-style harness because of its double loops.

Rogz Alleycat Harness and Lead Set 8mm from My Pet Warehouse

Figure 8 harness

With two loops that go around the cat’s neck and waist, this harness resembles the number 8 when laid on a flat surface. It is designed to give your cat more freedom to move.  

PUPTECK Cat Harness with Leash Set from Desert Cart

Vest harness

This harness looks like a sleeveless, close-fitting garment. Depending on the harness design, it can be closed at the belly or back with snaps, buckles, and velcro. 

Bond & Co Autumn Cat Harness from Pet Barn

How do you choose the right harness for your cat?

First off, never ever use a dog harness for your cat. Since your cat’s anatomy is different from a dog’s, it’s best to purchase one custom made for their species. 

The harness should be comfortably snug around your cat’s body, but still give her full range of movement in her head and leg areas. When worn, you should be able to insert two fingers under the neck and body loops. The adjustable straps should lock securely and not break away like cat collars. 

When figuring out the harness size you need, veterinarian Pippa Elliott suggests relying on the chest measurement of your cat. To measure your cat’s chest, place a tape measure around her behind her front legs. Make sure the tape measure doesn’t dig into her fur. Afterwards, add two to three more inches to get your ideal cat harness size. Don’t rely on the size chart because a large could be a medium for another brand. Instead, base it on the actual inches printed on the label.   

How do you make your cat get used to wearing a harness?

Before wearing the harness over your cat and taking her out, you must make her get used to it. Depending on their age and disposition, cats will take some time warming up to the idea of wearing a harness and walking outside. You need to be patient and flexible with them for the endeavour to succeed. However, there are ways to make your cat more comfortable with a cat harness:

  • Introduce the harness to your kitten as early as possible so she sees this as a “normal” part of her life. Though young kitties are known to be more adaptable, grown-up cats can also learn to accept using harnesses.  
  • Let your cat get to know the harness by leaving it close to her food bowl or her sleeping space. Allow her to sniff it and make herself more familiar with it.
  • Once she’s comfortable with its presence, try draping the harness over her body and observing how she reacts to it. If she doesn’t show signs of stress or annoyance, secure the straps and let her wear it for a few minutes at a time. Increase the duration little by little.   
  • You can use toys and treats to distract her from it. Remove the harness if she bites, scratches, or tries to remove it.  
  • Once she’s accustomed to wearing the harness, practice walking her indoors by attaching the leash. Let her feel the weight of the leash by making her walk around with the lead dragging on the floor. 
  • Have your first outdoor walk in a private and quiet place, such as your backyard. The less stressors for your cat, the better. Prepare her favourite treats and a towel or carrier in case she suddenly gets spooked by something. 

How do you put on a cat harness?

Once your cat is familiar with her harness, follow the steps depending on which kind of harness you purchase. When you put it on her for the first time, you can ask for help from another family member. Prepare treats to make it a positive experience for your cat.

H-style harness 

  1. Study the straps and figure out which goes over your cat’s chest and back. As a quick guide, the chest strap is always longer than the back strap.
  2. Slip your cat’s head through the shorter strap. Make sure the middle strap (the one that holds the two straps) lays flat on your cat’s back.
  3. Unbuckle the longer strap. Place it around your cat’s chest towards the back of her front legs, then fasten the buckle.  
  4. Check the fit of your cat’s harness. If needed, adjust the strap length through the buckles to make it more comfortable for your cat.

Figure 8 harness 

  1. Study the two straps. Similar to the H-style harness, the shorter loop goes around your cat’s head. 
  2. Slip your cat’s head through the short strap. Make sure the connecting part of the straps sits above your cat’s shoulder blades, not her belly.
  3. Unbuckle the long strap. Place it around your cat’s chest towards the back of her front legs, then fasten the buckle. 
  4. Check the fit of your cat’s harness. If the loop is too small to fit around your cat’s chest, you can adjust the harness to get some extra length.

Vest harness 

  1. Study the shape of the vest and its straps. The chest strap is longer than the back strap, similar to the H-style and figure 8 harnesses.
  2. Open the velcro or snaps before wearing it around your cat’s body.
  3. Position the shorter strap over your cat’s back, and fasten it under her neck. 
  4. Position the longer strap over your cat’s chest, and fasten it behind her front legs. 
  5. Check the fit of your cat’s harness. To make sure that it’s on properly, you can try lifting your cat while holding the D ring. 

Make each novel experience for your cat a positive one! If you notice that your cat really isn’t comfortable walking outside with her harness on, adjust your expectations and find another way to bond with her. Also, make sure your cat’s vaccinations are complete before taking her out to reduce the chances of her getting sick from outside elements.  

Click here to discover more cat-centric guides and adoption stories from Waldo’s Friends.

Why do cats knead?

Cats are beautiful creatures with unusual habits. If you’re adopting one for the very first time, it’s best to read up on as much cat behaviour as possible so you don’t get blindsided by their eccentricities. Kneading is one of those peculiar cat behaviours, and in this Waldo’s Friends article, we answer the questions: What Read More...

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Cats are beautiful creatures with unusual habits. If you’re adopting one for the very first time, it’s best to read up on as much cat behaviour as possible so you don’t get blindsided by their eccentricities. Kneading is one of those peculiar cat behaviours, and in this Waldo’s Friends article, we answer the questions:

  • What is kneading?
  • Why do cats knead?
  • How do I deal if my cat likes to knead me?

What is kneading?

Kneading is defined by Live Science as “a common behaviour seen in domestic cats, in which the feline pushes in and out with its front paws, alternating between left and right.” It is not necessarily done by all cats, but it is something that can be done by young kittens and full-grown felines. Because of the repeated rhythmic motion, kneading is also referred to as making biscuits or kneading dough. Kneading is different from scratching and usually involves cats selecting soft, pliant surfaces to massage such as pillows, blankets, and even their owners or other animals.  

Why do cats knead?

There are many theories as to why cats knead. Some of the most popular theories are:

1 Instinctively copy their ancestors

Long before cats became household pets, their predecessors lived in the wild. These animals had to flatten grass or foliage to create temporary places to rest or give birth. These days, your cat doesn’t need to trample on anything to make a cosy spot, but the kneading action can help her unwind and “turn down” her area before sleeping. 

2 Replicate nursing 

As mammals, kittens nurse from their mothers. They had to knead their mother’s breast tissue to stimulate and release milk. Since kneading as kittens produced favourable results, some scientists have theorised that grown-up cats continue to knead because of the positive and comforting association with nursing.

3 Communicate their affection

Kneading is sometimes accompanied by purring, which cats are also known to do as newborns. The repetitive action may be a way for your cat to reciprocate her love for you as you pet her. 

4 Stretch muscles

Cats love to stretch after a period of sitting still or napping. Stretching, which includes kneading, can help a cat activate her muscles, improve her blood circulation, and increase her alertness. 

5 Look for possible mates

Kneading is also a sign that female cats are open to mating. Aside from kneading the air, they could stretch or purr while lying on their side.  

6 Mark their territory

Known for being territorial creatures, cats mark their territory by releasing their scent found between their paw pads. Kneading on soft blankets, worn-out teddy bears, and even on you lets other animals know what’s rightfully theirs.  

How do I deal if my cat likes to knead me?

Many cats express their affection by sitting on their owner’s lap and kneading their legs. Some even accompany the movement with suckling on their human’s fingers or ear. If the cat owns a sharp set of claws or doesn’t know how to control herself, she may end up hurting her pawrent. 

If this sounds like a regular scenario with your cat, make sure to trim her nails regularly or consider placing caps on her nails. To protect yourself, you can also place a thick but soft cloth barrier before letting the cat sit on your lap. 

Discover more cat-related guides and adoption stories from Waldo’s Friends.

How to Clip Your Dog’s Nails

As a paw parent, you are responsible for the well-being of your furry companion. This includes overseeing your dog’s grooming, which is defined by Wikipedia as “the hygienic care and cleaning of a dog.” Dog grooming may be done by your trusted veterinarian or professional dog groomer on a regular basis. However, as a dog Read More...

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As a paw parent, you are responsible for the well-being of your furry companion. This includes overseeing your dog’s grooming, which is defined by Wikipedia as “the hygienic care and cleaning of a dog.” Dog grooming may be done by your trusted veterinarian or professional dog groomer on a regular basis. However, as a dog owner, it helps to groom your own dog at home to ensure he is clean, comfortable, and healthy. Grooming allows you to check on his skin, hair, ears, eyes, teeth, and nails while keeping an eye out for potential problems. The repeated act of grooming him also strengthens your bond and gets him used to the idea of being touched as he keeps still. The practice of grooming your dog at home includes brushing his hair (the frequency depends on his fur type and length), bathing him (the frequency depends on his health, breed, coat, activity level, and where his activities take place), clipping his nails, and even trimming his hair when needed.

When it comes to your dog’s nails, these should be generally kept short because he would have a difficult time walking with long nails. Uncut dog nails grow and curl into a spiral shape, which may pierce the paw pad and result in pain or infection. If you are considering clipping your dog’s nails, read on to discover the:

Dog nail clipping tools you’ll need 

Arm yourself with the right tools so you can trim your dog’s nails properly:

Kinds of nail clippers

When buying dog nail clippers, you can choose from these common types depending on your dog’s size and his nail thickness. Make sure to pick a pair that is safe and convenient for you, produces a precise cut in one stroke, and stays sharp for a long time.

Guillotine-type nail clippers 

Ideal for small to medium breeds, this type of clippers is ideal for people who suffer from hand pain or arthritis. Inserted through a stationary ring, the nail is cut when the blade comes down as the handles are pressed. Replacement blades can be bought to swap out the part as soon as it loses its sharpness, so you don’t have to buy a new set every time.

Guillotine-type nail clippers from Pet Circle

Scissors-type nail clippers 

Resembling a pair of scissors, this kind comes with two handles that control two blades. A small half-circle is designed in one of the blades, which is where you insert the dog’s nail. Scissor-style trimmers work best on longer nails that have curled up, or for dogs who are less than 10 pounds. This pair also needs to be sharpened from time to time. 

Scissors-type dog nail clippers from My Pet Warehouse

Pliers-type nail clippers 

This usually comes in a bigger and sturdy format, which is great for large dog breeds or any size in general. When used, the pliers-type creates a popping sound that might frighten sound-sensitive dogs. Just like the scissors-type clippers, its blade also needs to be regularly sharpened or it may accidentally crush or twist a dog’s nails. 

Pliers-type dog nail clippers from Petbarn

Dogs with bad experiences with nail clippers may be more open to using a nail grinder. Instead of trimming the nail in one swift cut, the tool gradually grinds the nails into the preferred length and gives them a smooth, rounded edge

How to prepare for a nail clipping session

Prepare yourself:

  • Do your research before you even consider clipping your dog’s nails! Watch tutorials (this YouTube clip shows you how to cut your dog’s nails whether he has white or black-coloured nails) and read our step-by-step guide until you feel confident enough to do it.
  • Ask your veterinarian or dog groomer to recommend the best type of clippers to purchase for your dog, and to demonstrate how to use it during your next visit. 
  • Test the tools before you actually use them on your dog. Feel the weight of the tools in your hands. Open and close the clipper, grip it using your dominant hand, and check to see if the blades are sharp enough. 
  • Always remember to “clip the tip and not the quick.” This means that you should clip a little at a time to avoid hitting his nerves and blood vessels. 
  • When you finally decide to clip your dog’s nails, be sure to approach the process in a relaxed manner or your dog will feel your anxiety. Pay attention to your dog’s body language and clip his nails when he is feeling calm and relaxed. As you go through each nail, watch for signs of uneasiness such as pulling away his paw or yawning repeatedly.   

Prepare your dog:

  • Start grooming practices as soon as you bring your puppy home to make him accustomed to being touched in various parts of his body. Dog trainer Lori Nanan suggests pairing body-handling exercises with treats. 
  • Help your dog develop a positive association with nail clipping. Days before you clip his nails, make him feel relaxed by massaging him and pressing on the parts you’ll be holding (i.e. paws, toes, nails, and legs). You can also familiarise him with the pose you’d like him to do as he gets his nails clipped.
  • Make your pooch get used to the clipper a few days before using it on him. On the first day, position it near his nails and feet, then praise him and give him a treat. Repeat this for 10 to 15 times. Do the same process the next day, but add the motion of the clippers so that he can see how it looks and hear the sound it makes as it moves. 
  • If your dog tries to growl or nip you as you touch his paws, stop what you’re doing so you don’t get harmed. Speak with your veterinarian or a dog behaviour consultant on the best way to address this concern. Your dog may be experiencing pain or could have past trauma associated with paw touching.  
dog paws

How to clip your dog’s nails

Once you’ve gained confidence, mastered using the clipping tools, and familiarised your dog with the process, it’s time to clip his nails following this step-by-step procedure:

  1. Get him to stand on a sturdy table or a grooming table with a grooming arm. You can also allow him to sit on your lap, as long as he can hold the pose and you can easily control his movements throughout the nail clipping. 
  2. Use your dominant hand to hold the clippers, and use your other hand to hold his paw. If you want to limit your dog’s movement, you can lightly lean over his body as you clip his nails.
  3. Gently press on the knuckle to extend each nail. Put the nail through the blade/s of the clippers. The trimmer handles can be held pointing toward the floor or toward the ceiling. Just make sure that the cutting blade faces you and not your dog.  
  4. Close the clippers quickly to take off a small piece of the nail so you don’t end up hitting the quick. For dogs with light-coloured nails, the quick ends where the pink colour changes to white when viewed from the side of the nail. For dogs with black-coloured nails, look at his nails from underneath the tips. Start off by trimming the hooks. The dead area is usually whitish in colour, and as you cut into the nail, you’ll need to stop when you see the solid black center (which is the live area). 
  5. Your dog has dew claws, which are found on the inner sides of his paws. They do not touch the ground because of their position, so they may be longer than his other nails. You can use guillotine-type clippers to trim these claws.
  6. Accidents happen no matter how many times you’ve clipped your dogs nails. If you unexpectedly hit the quick, apply pressure to your dog’s nail using a tissue or towel then apply styptic powder to make the bleeding stop. You can also apply ice on the nail to slow down the bleeding. 
  7. Praise your dog as you clip his nails. Feed him treats after each nail is clipped. Don’t force yourself to finish trimming all his nails in one day. 

You won’t have to clip your dog’s nails every day, but it has to be done habitually depending on how fast his nails grow, his breed, and his size. As with any pet-related activity, nail clipping should be done with patience and love to make the experience a positive one for you and your dog.  

Click here to discover the other ways to groom your dog at home, such as brushing his hair and giving him a bath. If you’ve just recently brought home a puppy, read this helpful guide to learn what to expect during his first year with you!

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