Tag: can dogs eat

Best Human Food for Puppies

Whether you come across them through fostering or adopting, puppies are one of the most adorable four-legged baby animals you’ll ever encounter! There’s a lot you’ll need to learn so you can help them grow up to be physically, mentally, and emotionally healthy dogs. Nutrition is one of the key factors in their overall development, Read More...

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Whether you come across them through fostering or adopting, puppies are one of the most adorable four-legged baby animals you’ll ever encounter! There’s a lot you’ll need to learn so you can help them grow up to be physically, mentally, and emotionally healthy dogs. Nutrition is one of the key factors in their overall development, and in this article, we tackle: 

Before we dive into the topic, remember that this blog post is meant to assist puppy pawrents and foster carers with all the information they need to provide for their pups. It should not replace consultations with a veterinarian. To achieve optimal results, create a meal plan with your vet that will cater to all your young pooch’s needs.  

When is a dog considered a puppy?

A dog is considered a puppy from the moment he is born until he is about six to 18 months old. Born deaf, blind, and unable to regulate his body temperature, he initially relies on his mother as well as his sense of touch and smell to experience the world. Gradually, he gets to see, hear, and bark—helping him socialise with his littermates and other people. 

When can I feed food to a puppy?

The production of mother’s milk begins to decrease at four weeks. This is the perfect time for puppies to begin eating solid food, as some or most of his baby teeth have already come out. At this point, puppies won’t get all the calories they need from their mother’s milk, so it’s important for them to start eating specially formulated puppy food. The entire weaning process takes about two to four weeks, so a puppy should have fully transitioned to solid food by eight weeks old.

Start off by feeding him four times a day during the weaning stage, then slowly decrease the number to twice a day by the time he reaches one year old. Ask your veterinarian for puppy food brand recommendations and the right amount to give for each meal based on his breed/size, weight, and activities. Observe your puppy’s growth and eating habits, adjusting the frequency and amount of food when necessary. Two telltale signs that your puppy is digesting the food well are through formed brown feces and a thick and shiny coat.

What human food can I feed my puppy?

Give your growing pup “complete and balanced” meals that will supply all the nutrients his body requires. The easiest way to do so is by purchasing commercially made puppy food that meets the requirements established by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) or by the Pet Food Industry Association of Australia (PFIAA). The store-bought puppy food should contain the correct ratio of protein, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. 

Another option is to feed your pet homemade meals using puppy-friendly human food. The recipes should be approved by your veterinarian or carefully formulated with the help of a veterinary nutritionist. This may seem like a cost-effective option, but it’ll take commitment and effort to prepare these meals. You can use these ingredients from your kitchen:

  • Protein: Try fish, turkey, lean beef, and chicken. Do not serve raw meat because your puppy’s immune system may not be able to fight off pathogens found in them. Make sure to remove all the cooked bones, which may splinter and injure your puppy’s internal organs.
  • Carbohydrates: Go for pasta, ripe potatoes, and rice that have been cooked without any seasonings such as salt, herbs, and spices. 
  • Vegetables: Carrots, green beans, peas, broccoli, and asparagus can be fed to your puppy as long as they are prepared properly (don’t include sauces or dips!) and are soft enough for chewing. To help your puppy, you can also slice the vegetable into bite-sized pieces or blend it.  
  • Fat: A drop or two of vegetable oil will help meet your puppy’s fat requirement. 

Always use fresh, all-natural ingredients. To make sure your pup isn’t allergic or intolerant to a certain ingredient, do a quick check by feeding him a small amount. Observe him for any changes in the next 24 hours. Vitamin or mineral supplements can be purchased from your veterinarian or other reputable sources. It is not recommended to mix in your own medicine. 

As for treats given as snacks or rewards, make sure not to go over 5 to 10% of your puppy’s daily calories. Fruits such as apple, banana, cantaloupe, orange, and watermelon can be fed to young dogs as long as the seeds, core, and other hard layers are removed. Some fruits are sweeter than others, so it’s best to check how many pieces you can give per fruit type depending on your puppy’s size and weight.

TIP: Go through our “can dogs eat” for a list of human food your puppy can and cannot consume.

Other puppy feeding reminders

Do not interchange puppy food with adult dog food. Puppy food is packed with essential nutrients to match his rapid growth, which takes place within the first five months of his life. You can transition from a growth diet to a maintenance diet once your puppy has reached 90% of his expected adult weight. It takes about nine to 12 months for small breeds to finish growing, while larger breeds take about 12 to 18 months.

Be careful not to underfeed or overfeed your pet. Underfeeding will lead to malnourishment. On the other hand, overfeeding may lead to muscle and bone problems, especially those belonging to large and giant breeds. It is acceptable for a puppy to have baby fat for the first few weeks, but his ribs should be visible by the time he is eight to 10 weeks old.  

Some puppies may be finicky eaters or may enjoy playing with their food, so you have to find ways to encourage them to eat it. To invite your puppy to try his new food, dip your finger into the food and hold out your finger for your pup to lick. You can also help him get used to eating dry kibble by adding warm water until it feels spongy and easy to munch on. 

Learn more about caring for puppies by reading our list of first year firsts. You can also discover effective techniques in crate training or potty training your pup!

Can Dogs Eat Apricots?

The short answer: Yes, but with caution. The long answer: Round and yellow, apricots are stone fruits that look similar to peaches. They are packed with nutrients (such as potassium, and vitamins A, E, and C) and a considerable amount of antioxidants (such as beta carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin) that can help fight cancer. Though Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, but with caution.

The long answer: Round and yellow, apricots are stone fruits that look similar to peaches. They are packed with nutrients (such as potassium, and vitamins A, E, and C) and a considerable amount of antioxidants (such as beta carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin) that can help fight cancer.

Though the fleshy part of the apricot is safe for your dog to consume, the stems, leaves, and pits are another matter. They must be removed and disposed of properly because they contain cyanide, which is toxic for your pooch. If you suspect your dog ate dropped apricots from your backyard, observe for symptoms of cyanide poisoning: dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock. If your canine pet accidentally swallows the apricot pit, contact your vet immediately. The pit may cause dental damage, airway blockage, and/or intestinal obstruction and injury. 

A few pieces of dried apricots may be given to your pooch as long as they do not contain sugar and other artificial flavourings. Before feeding it to your dog, check the nutrition facts label, or better yet, make homemade ones instead. 

How to feed apricot to your dog: Remove the apricot skin, pit, and overripe parts. Share one or two small pieces of the fleshy part.

Treats should only make up 5 to 10% of your dog’s total caloric intake, so ask your vet how many pieces you can safely give your pet based on his size and dietary needs.  

Here are three ideas for apricot treats your dog will love:

  1. Cut up fresh apricot into slivers and top it over your dog’s meal.
  2. Blend and mix it with dog-friendly fruits and yogurt for a refreshing drink.
  3. Feed him one to two pieces of dried apricot as a reward for being a good boy. 

In summary: Dogs do not need apricots in their diet. But if your dog is curious about the fruit, the flesh may be fed to him as an occasional treat. Do not give him too much in one sitting, as this fiber-rich fruit may cause digestive upset. More importantly, do not allow your dog to sniff around apricot trees. He may chew on the stems, leaves, or pits and suffer from cyanide poisoning.  

References: 

5 Exotic Fruits Your Pet Can Eat Safely

9 Health and Nutrition Benefits of Apricots

Can Dogs Eat Apricots?

6 Dangers of Stone Fruits for Dogs

Can Dogs Eat Honeydew?

The short answer: Yes, but in moderation. The long answer: Honeydew is a fruit that belongs to the melon family. It usually has a smooth, pale outer skin in the shade of yellow or green. Underneath the hard peel is sweet green flesh accompanied by small seeds, usually found at the center of the fruit.  Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, but in moderation.

The long answer: Honeydew is a fruit that belongs to the melon family. It usually has a smooth, pale outer skin in the shade of yellow or green. Underneath the hard peel is sweet green flesh accompanied by small seeds, usually found at the center of the fruit. 

This type of melon is packed with water, potassium, folate, vitamin C, and other nutrients that are good for your canine. However, it is also high in fiber and sugar, so it is not recommended for overweight and diabetic dogs. Too much of this fruit may cause vomiting and diarrhea. 

How to feed honeydew to your dog: Remove the honeydew skin and rind, take out the seeds, then cut the fruit into bite-sized pieces your dog can chew. Dispose of the hard outer parts and seeds properly. 

Start off by giving your pooch one small portion, and see how his body reacts to it. Observe his bowel movement, making sure it doesn’t become loose. 

Here are three ideas for honeydew treats your dog will love:

  1. Serve chilled pieces of honeydew to your dog on a sweltering day.
  2. Replace the cantaloupe with honeydew in this frozen paw pop recipe.
  3. Your pooch will enjoy this fresh salad made of a variety of fruits.

In summary: A delicious and hydrating fruit, honeydew is a welcome addition to your dog’s diet and can be given as a tasty snack or reward during training sessions. As long as your pup does not have issues with his weight or blood sugar, he may occasionally enjoy a few pieces of this fruit to help him cool down on a hot day or simply satisfy his sweet tooth.

References: 

Can Dogs Eat This? The Ultimate Guide To 105 Food Items

Wikipedia: Honeydew (melon)

Can My Dog Eat Honeydew Melon?

Can Dogs Eat Honeydew?

Can Dogs Eat Coconut Oil?

The short answer: Yes, but only in limited quantities. The long answer: Also called coconut butter, coconut oil is derived from the kernels, meat, and milk of the coconut fruit and palm. It is a good source of energy, fat, iron, and vitamins E and K. Though this oil may be fed to your dog Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, but only in limited quantities.

The long answer: Also called coconut butter, coconut oil is derived from the kernels, meat, and milk of the coconut fruit and palm. It is a good source of energy, fat, iron, and vitamins E and K. Though this oil may be fed to your dog in limited amounts (too much of it may cause upset stomach or diarrhea!), it can also be applied to his skin and coat to improve their appearance. 

Coconut oil can help with the development of your dog’s cognitive function, bone structure, digestion, and immunity. It may even be used to improve his bad breath and coat pills if your dog has problems swallowing them. However, it is also known for being high in saturated fats, so it is not recommended for overweight dogs. Dogs with a history of pancreatitis should also not be fed coconut oil because the fatty acids found in it may trigger another attack. 

How to feed coconut oil to your dog: Start off by feeding a small amount to your dog (as little as ¼ teaspoon for small breeds) and observe him for any physical or behavioural changes. If the coconut oil agrees with him, you can microwave a spoonful of coconut oil for about 10 seconds and mix it with your dog’s food. 

Here are three ideas for coconut oil treats your dog will love:

  1. All-natural peanut butter mixed with coconut oil produces the best homemade treats.
  2. Combine blueberries with coconut oil, place the mixture in an ice tray, then pop it in the freezer for a refreshing snack!
  3. Try making this five-ingredient grain-free dog treat.

In summary: When fed correctly to your pooch, coconut-derived oil may provide him with lasting benefits. Too much of it may lead to weight gain and high cholesterol, so it is advisable to consult with your veterinarian before adding coconut oil to your canine’s diet.  

References: 

Food dogs should not eat and some they should

Wikipedia: Coconut oil

Can Dogs Eat Coconut Oil?

Is Coconut Oil Good or Bad for Dogs? The Surprising Truth

Coconut Oil For Dogs: Understanding the Benefits and Risks

Can Dogs Eat Beef?

The short answer: Yes. The long answer: A type of meat that can be given as a treat or meal, beef is safe for your dog to consume. It is high in vitamins B12, B3, and B6, as well as protein, iron, selenium, and zinc. Lean beef is your dog’s best option, and it should Read More...

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The short answer: Yes.

The long answer: A type of meat that can be given as a treat or meal, beef is safe for your dog to consume. It is high in vitamins B12, B3, and B6, as well as protein, iron, selenium, and zinc. Lean beef is your dog’s best option, and it should be prepared without flavourings and sauces. Ingredients considered harmful for your dog include salt, onion, and garlic (either in raw or powdered forms).

How to feed beef to your dog: Select the safe parts of the beef. Opt for ground lean beef chuck or buy lean cuts (top round, bottom round, the eye of round, flank and strip loin) that you can grind in a food processor. 

Boil, sauté, bake, boil, or grill the lean beef, making sure to cook it thoroughly before serving it to your dog. Raw beef may cause salmonella infection, and is harmful for young puppies and dogs with compromised livers or kidneys. Cut the beef into smaller pieces, and take out the bones and excess fat.   

Here are three ideas for beef treats your dog will love:

  1. Turn ground beef into cheesy baked muttballs
  2. Whip up some dog biscuits for your next training session.
  3. Ground beef is the key ingredient to making dog-approved beef stew.

In summary: An affordable meat your pup will enjoy eating, cooked lean beef can help sustain your dog’s energy, give him beautiful skin and coat, and aid in his muscle development. Some dogs are allergic to beef, so consult with your veterinarian before adding this type of meat in his regular diet. 

References: 

Ultimate Guide to What Dogs Can Eat

Can My Dog Eat This? A List of Human Foods Dogs Can and Can’t Eat

Can My Dog Eat Beef?

What is the healthiest meat to feed your dog?

How to Cook Ground Meat for Dogs

Can Dogs Eat Chicken?

The short answer: Yes. The long answer: One of the most common ingredients of dog food, chicken contains many nutritional benefits for your dog. When prepared correctly, the cooked meat can provide energy, help build lean muscle mass, and promote bone health. However, it is not recommended for dogs to eat raw chicken (especially puppies Read More...

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The short answer: Yes.

The long answer: One of the most common ingredients of dog food, chicken contains many nutritional benefits for your dog. When prepared correctly, the cooked meat can provide energy, help build lean muscle mass, and promote bone health. However, it is not recommended for dogs to eat raw chicken (especially puppies with weak immune systems) due to the possibility of contracting salmonella. Similarly, feeding your pooch raw or cooked chicken bones is not recommended as it may create potential hazards. Chewing on chicken bones may break his teeth, block his airway or intestines, and cause oral or digestive injuries.

How to feed chicken to your dog: Choose white meat over dark meat since the dark meat may lead to pancreatitis. Roast, grill, poach, bake, or boil the chicken without adding unnecessary seasonings such as salt, garlic, and onion. Before feeding cooked chicken to your pooch, remove the skin and bones, then chop into bite-sized pieces. 

Refrain from feeding your dog processed chicken with breading as these may contain harmful ingredients such as sugar, spices, and other artificial flavourings.

Here are three ideas for chicken treats your dog will love:

  1. Pooches with upset stomachs may gain energy by eating boiled chicken and plain rice.
  2. Combine minced chicken, veggies, rice, and water to create a power-packed meal.  
  3. Train your pup with some homemade chewy jerky made from chicken breasts!

In summary: Chicken is a great source of protein, omega-6 fatty acids, glucosamine, and essential amino acids. As long as your pooch is not allergic to chicken, he can enjoy the cooked variant on its own or combined with other dog-friendly ingredients. Before including chicken in his diet, try feeding him a small piece and observing him for the next 24 hours.  

References: 

Food dogs should not eat and some they should 

Ultimate Guide to What Dogs Can Eat

Can My Dog Eat This? A List of Human Foods Dogs Can and Can’t Eat

Can Dogs Eat Chicken?

Can Dogs Eat Pretzels?

The short answer: It is not recommended. The long answer: Whether the small and hard type or the big and soft kind, pretzels are snacks that should not be consumed by dogs. Aside from being loaded with salt, this snack may also be topped with garlic or onions, which can cause gastrointestinal distress and/or blood Read More...

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The long answer: Whether the small and hard type or the big and soft kind, pretzels are snacks that should not be consumed by dogs. Aside from being loaded with salt, this snack may also be topped with garlic or onions, which can cause gastrointestinal distress and/or blood poisoning. It can also be served with sweet or savory sauces, which are also not recommended for your pet. 

What to do if your dog accidentally eats pretzels: Check the nutrition facts label to discover all the ingredients used to make the pretzels, and find out how many pieces your dog ate. Consult with your veterinarian if you notice any sudden changes in your dog’s mood, feeding, or toilet habits. Excessive thirst, urination, depression, increase in body temperature, tremors, vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures are signs that your dog has consumed too much salt.

In summary: Pretzels are high in carbohydrates and low in fat and protein. They do not provide necessary nutritional value for your pooch, so you’re better off serving him dog-friendly vegetables and fruits as treats. You should never give pretzels to your dog unless you can guarantee that they do not contain harmful ingredients.  

References:

People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pet

The Most Poisonous Foods for Dogs

Toxic and Dangerous Foods Your Dogs Should Never Eat

Ultimate Guide to What Dogs Can Eat

Can Dogs Eat Pretzels? What You Need To Know!

Can Dogs Eat Mandarins?

The short answer: Yes, but only in moderation. The long answer: Mandarins are a variant of oranges, which dogs can consume in small quantities. Compared to oranges, they are described as being smaller in size, sweeter in taste, and flatter in shape. They also have a thinner, looser skin that makes them easy to peel. Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, but only in moderation.

The long answer: Mandarins are a variant of oranges, which dogs can consume in small quantities. Compared to oranges, they are described as being smaller in size, sweeter in taste, and flatter in shape. They also have a thinner, looser skin that makes them easy to peel.

Because mandarins are high in sugar and acid, it is best to limit your dog’s intake to only a few pieces depending on his size, health, and caloric requirements. Too much of the fruit may cause gastrointestinal discomfort and/or diarrhea.

How to feed mandarins to your dog: Peel off the mandarin rind and dispose of it responsibly. This will prevent your dog from accidentally biting or eating it. Also, take out the pith and seeds before feeding a section of the fruit to your dog. The seeds might cause your pet to choke or have internal blockage. They also contain cyanide, which is lethal for your canine.

Here are three ideas for mandarin treats your dog will love:

  1. Replace orange for mandarin to make dog-friendly ice cream.
  2. Top one or two pieces of mandarin over his dry kibble to add texture and flavour.
  3. Refrigerate and serve slices of mandarin as a refreshing treat.  

In summary: Naturally sweet and packed with vitamin C, mandarins are citrus fruits that you can occasionally give to your canine. Dogs will not benefit from consuming mandarins on a regular basis, so it’s best not to make your pooch get fond of its taste and texture. 

References: 

What’s The Difference Between Oranges, Mandarins, Satsumas, Clementines, Tangerines?

Ask The Vet – Can Dogs Eat Mandarins, Clementines and Tangerines?

Can My Dog Eat Mandarins?

Can Dogs Eat Mashed Potatoes?

The short answer: It depends. The long answer: Made from cooked potatoes, mashed potatoes can be fed to your dog only if they are freshly made and do not contain any flavourings and preservatives. Salt and milk are harmful for your dog, so they should not be mixed into the mashed potatoes you make for Read More...

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The short answer: It depends.

The long answer: Made from cooked potatoes, mashed potatoes can be fed to your dog only if they are freshly made and do not contain any flavourings and preservatives. Salt and milk are harmful for your dog, so they should not be mixed into the mashed potatoes you make for your pet. Similarly, complementary sauces like gravy or heavy creams should not be added. 

Potatoes are known to be packed with vitamins and minerals such as vitamin C, vitamin B6, iron, and magnesium. These help support your dog’s immune system, nervous system, and nutrient absorption. However, diabetic dogs should not eat potatoes because they may cause an increase in his blood sugar levels. 

How to feed mashed potatoes to your dog: Wash the potatoes properly. Remove the stems, shoots, and green parts. Boil them in water for about 15 minutes, then drain. Skin the potatoes, then cut into cubes. Using a fork or a masher, mash the pieces until you attain the desired texture. 

Here are three ideas for mashed potato treats your dog will love:

  1. Mix mashed potatoes with dog kibble for these homemade bites.
  2. Level up your dog’s mashed potatoes by adding cauliflower to the recipe
  3. For a change, try making mashed sweet potato for your pup!

In summary: Mashed potatoes are safe for dog consumption if they are properly prepared and served in moderate amounts. The starchy carbohydrate offers little nutritional value to your dog, so it’s best to give it to him as an occasional treat. Too much mashed potatoes may cause vomiting or diarrhea.  

References: 

Food dogs should not eat and some they should

Can Dogs Eat This? The Ultimate Guide To 105 Food Items

Can My Dog Eat Mashed Potatoes?

The Best Food to Feed an Elderly Dog

Here at Waldo’s Friends, we are big fans of dogs of all sizes, colours, and ages. Senior dogs hold a special place in our hearts because we’ve encountered some of the sweetest and kindest aging canines over the years. Though they are not as playful and active as young puppies, they still have a lot Read More...

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Here at Waldo’s Friends, we are big fans of dogs of all sizes, colours, and ages. Senior dogs hold a special place in our hearts because we’ve encountered some of the sweetest and kindest aging canines over the years. Though they are not as playful and active as young puppies, they still have a lot of sloppy kisses and warm cuddles to give. 

If you’re wondering about how to care for senior dogs through the food they eat, you’ve come to the right place! This Waldo’s Friends blog post discusses:

But remember, this article should not replace a visit to your veterinarian. This is only meant to be a guide to help you make informed decisions on the well-being of your aging pet. 

How old is a senior dog?

Dogs can go through six life stages. Your dog is considered a puppy when he is born until he is able to reproduce, which is dependent on his breed. He becomes a junior from about 6 to 12 months old, then officially turns into an adult when he stops growing. When he goes past 7 years old, he is considered a mature dog. Then, he is called a senior during the last quarter of his life expectancy, and a geriatric when he goes beyond his breed’s life expectancy.  

Take note that age is only an approximate indicator. In an interview with Fetch, Fred Metzger, DVM revealed that being categorised as senior or geriatric “really depends on the breed and body weight [of a dog]. Large and giant breeds age faster than smaller dogs.” Additionally, your dog can be considered mature when he has reached half of his life expectancy. RSPCA shared a list of the average lifespan of popular dog breeds, ranging from 5.5 years (dogue de bordeaux) to 14.2 years (miniature poodle). As long as your dog is healthy and provided for in every aspect of his life, he may live beyond his breed’s life expectancy. 

When should I switch to senior dog food?

Large-sized dogs are generally called seniors by the time they turn 6 years old. Meanwhile, small-sized dogs more or less become seniors when they hit the 10-year mark. As these beloved dogs grow older, it is common for their health and stamina to deteriorate. As such, aging canines may suffer from these common health problems:

  • Cancer
  • Dementia
  • Gastrointestinal problems 
  • Hearing loss 
  • Heart issues
  • Joint problems
  • Kidney issues 
  • Obesity 
  • Vision loss

Switching your pet’s meals to specially formulated senior dog food is something that you should discuss with your veterinarian. He would most likely run physical exams, blood tests, and other wellness tests to assess your dog’s health before he can recommend the best diet. The new meal plan may include food formulation changes, as well as adjustments to the quantity and frequency of his meals.

What should be in the food of my senior dog?

It’s time to purchase (or even make) your senior dog’s new food after getting your vet’s approval and recommendations. Remember that it should be a well-balanced diet that caters to your dog’s specific needs. If you need to feed him a new brand or type of food, gradually introduce this to him over 7 days to prevent gastrointestinal troubles. Adjust the ratio by slowly increasing the amount of the new food, helping your dog get used to its taste and texture. Stop feeding the new food if your dog vomits or has the runs. 

It is recommended that you give your senior dog food which are:

  • Adequate in protein: Aging dogs need the right amount of high-quality protein (about 25%) to help them retain body weight and muscle mass. Protein also helps keep the body strong by assisting the immune system. However, dogs with kidney issues should have a lower amount of protein in their diet, so it doesn’t put too much strain on their kidneys.
  • High in fiber: Constipation is a common condition of senior dogs, so getting them food rich in fiber (containing 3 to 5%) can assist their bowel movement.  
  • Low in calories: Because older dogs are not as active as young pups, they do not need to use as much energy throughout the day. Low-calorie meals can help prevent obesity, which develops into diabetes in some dogs. 
  • Low in fat: Senior dog food tends to have lower levels of fat (about 8 to 12%), which translates to lower calories. Diabetic dogs will benefit from eating meals that are low in fat but high in fiber. 

Aside from consuming high-quality meals, senior dogs should eat treats low in fat and sodium. Fresh vegetables and fruits, such as carrots and apples, are healthy alternatives. Just make sure his snack portions do not go over his recommended daily intake. 

TIP: Check out which vegetables and fruits dogs can safely eat through our Can Dogs Eat category!

Other reminders for feeding older dogs 

  • Water is essential in keeping aging dogs hydrated. Some diseases or medications cause older dogs to pee frequently, so they need to continuously replenish the lost fluids from their bodies. Place bowls filled with fresh, cool water throughout the house to encourage your senior dog to drink up. 
  • Dry kibble may help reduce gum disease and control tartar buildup in senior dogs. But if your dog is used to eating wet food, he may not appreciate the switch.
  • If your dog isn’t too keen on eating dry food, you can add some warm water or chicken broth to make it more palatable. Adding a small amount of canned dog food might also do the trick!
  • If your senior dog doesn’t receive enough nutrients from his food, your veterinarian may recommend feeding him supplements. Dogs suffering from arthritis and joint pain may benefit from eating omega-3 fatty acids, glucosamine, and chondroitin. These chemicals help decrease inflammation and support the rebuilding of lost cartilage substance. 

If you notice any changes in your senior dog’s energy levels, his appearance, his food/water intake, his behaviour, or his toilet habits, speak with your veterinarian.  

Check out our guides to read more articles on responsible dog parenting. Uncover the best slow feeder bowl to get for your pooch, or learn 10 ways to help an anxious dog.

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