Tag: grooming

Is Old Spice Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Old Spice is not cruelty free. The long answer: Old Spice is an American brand that has been selling male grooming products as early as 1937. It is known for its deodorants and antiperspirants, but has expanded its range to sell grooming products such as shampoos, body washes, and soaps. It Read More...

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The short answer: No, Old Spice is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Old Spice is an American brand that has been selling male grooming products as early as 1937. It is known for its deodorants and antiperspirants, but has expanded its range to sell grooming products such as shampoos, body washes, and soaps. It was originally owned by Shulton Company, which was founded by William Lightfoot Schultz. In 1990, ownership was transferred to American multinational consumer goods corporation, Procter & Gamble.

Old Spice’s official website does not contain detailed information about their position on animal testing. However, its parent company reveals on its website: “P&G has invested in non-animal test method development for decades, and is also a founding sponsor and has been a leading presenter at every World Congress on non-animal test methods to date- involving thousands of scientists, regulators, and policy makers. We continue to partner with leading international animal welfare organizations, academia, industry coalitions and policy makers to promote alternatives to animal testing and gain their regulatory acceptance. Together, we have achieved a lot. We stopped animal testing our cosmetics products many years ago. In fact, P&G no longer animal tests any consumer product unless required by law and we are committed to make animal testing obsolete.”

At present, Old Spice products are available in mainland China. This particular country requires all imported grooming products to be tested on animals, which are conducted by health officials or authorised third parties. Old Spice and P&G need to comply with Chinese mandatory regulations to be able to sell its products in the country. Therefore, the men’s grooming brand cannot be considered completely cruelty free.  

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Old Spice

CFK: Old Spice

Is Old Spice Cruelty-Free in 2020?

Our Commitment to Be Cruelty Free

How to Help Remove Fleas on Your Cat

Fleas are tiny bugs that move around by jumping from place to place. They can leap onto the coat of your cat, making her skin itchy and sore. Though cats are known to self-groom fastidiously, they won’t always be able to remove these pesky creatures by themselves. That’s where you come in as a helpful Read More...

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Fleas are tiny bugs that move around by jumping from place to place. They can leap onto the coat of your cat, making her skin itchy and sore. Though cats are known to self-groom fastidiously, they won’t always be able to remove these pesky creatures by themselves. That’s where you come in as a helpful pet parent! Aside from having regular grooming activities with your cat, it’s best to do daily checks on her skin and fur so you can spot fleas and prevent an infestation from happening in your home. 

If you’re curious to find out how to get rid of fleas on your cat, this article answers the questions: 

What are fleas?

Fleas are small, wingless parasites that ingest the blood of cats, dogs, and humans by piercing through its host’s skin. Though they are only about one-eighth of an inch in size, fleas can leap vertically as tall as one foot and land on your cat without her knowing it. These pesky creatures thrive in warm temperatures with high humidity, so don’t be surprised if your cat catches them during the summer season. 

Just a single flea can cause an infestation in your home. One female flea can lay 20 eggs at a time, and can produce 500 eggs in her short life span. These eggs can roll off your pet and burrow deep in your cat’s sleeping mattress, your carpet, your furniture, the baseboards, and other warm spots. Adult fleas can even last for months without feeding—that’s how tenacious they are! 

How can you tell if your cat has fleas?

Both outdoor and indoor cats are susceptible to fleas. You can tell that your cat has fleas if:

  • Your cat is constantly scratching or biting her body
  • Your cat is excessively grooming herself
  • There is redness or sore patches on your cat’s skin
  • There are bald spots on your cat’s body
  • Your cat’s neck, lower back, hind legs, and/or tail have look irritated
  • Your cat is suffering from muscle loss, lethargy, or pale gums
  • There are strange movements in your cat’s fur, with tiny bugs bouncing off her coat
  • You can find specs of red or black particles on your cat’s fur (which are actually flea droppings)
  • You have strange reddish bites on your body

What happens if your cat has fleas?

More than making your cat feel uncomfortable, flea bites can carry various diseases that can be transmitted to humans. Some of these illnesses include tapeworms, flea allergy dermatitis, feline infectious anemia, cat scratch fever, and murine typhus. If these are not treated accordingly, they will affect your cat’s well-being. Crusty or dull coat, weight and appetite loss, fever, vomiting, or even death are some of its effects. 

How can you remove fleas on your cat?

We highly recommend that you bring your cat to the veterinarian if you suspect she has fleas. Once the vet has confirmed your assumption, do these with your vet’s guidance:

1 Use vet-approved treatments on your cat. 

Your vet may recommend topical or oral medication that your cat can take to eliminate the fleas living within her coat. There are shampoos, powders, sprays, and other spot-on treatments you can readily buy, but it is important to know the proper way to administer the medication, the right amount to apply, and how often it should be applied. 

Common active ingredients found in topical flea treatments include fipronil, imidacloprid, selamectin, fluralaner, flumethrin, and imidacloprid. Meanwhile, nitenpyram and spinosad are usually found in oral flea medication. They either kill adult fleas or provide month-long flea protection.

Frontline Spray prevents cat flea infestation, including the deadly Paralysis tick

2 Give your cat a bath.

First, purchase an anti-flea shampoo that is recommended by your vet. (Remember that some brands may not be suitable for kittens under two months old.) Trim your cat’s nails one to two days before giving her a bath to reduce scratching accidents. Consider giving her a bath in the sink or a small tub half-filled with warm water to make her feel more at ease. 

Use lukewarm water to wet your cat’s fur, then gently apply lathered flea shampoo all over her body. Make sure to avoid her eyes, ears, and nose. Remember that your cat’s skin may have sensitive spots or open wounds due to the flea bites, so do not scrub her in a strong manner. Let the shampoo settle into your cat’s body for three to five minutes before rinsing it off. Dry your cat with a clean towel and a hairdryer if she is agreeable to it. 

3 Comb your cat’s fur.

Use a fine-toothed metal comb that can remove adult fleas as well as flea eggs, larvae, and debris. Dip your comb in a mixture of water and liquid dish detergent to kill the fleas. Gently comb this through her fur while being extra careful around her face, neck, and tail.

Prepare a bowl of hot water mixed with soap. As soon as you get fleas on your comb, submerge them in the bowl. Do not try to squish the fleas since they can easily jump off your fingers. 

Animates 2 Sided Flea Cat Comb helps remove fleas, eggs, debris, and dust

4 Get her a flea collar. 

Prevent fleas from coming back by giving your cat a flea collar. Depending on the brand you buy, the flea collar can either repel or emit active ingredients that can kill fleas instantly. These collars are inexpensive compared to spot-on flea treatments, and can work for as long as eight months! 

Remember that if your cat drinks flea medication or has topical treatment applied on her fur, you don’t need to make her wear a flea collar. Exposure to these flea-killing chemicals might harm your cat in the long run. 

Seresto Fleas & Tick Collar can be used for kittens over 10 weeks old

5 Eliminate fleas in and outside your home. 

Aside from killing adult fleas, it’s important to destroy flea eggs and larvae that may be scattered around your home, just waiting to infect your cat. From your area rugs to your beddings, do a deep clean of your home to remove all traces of fleas. Vacuum all surfaces possible (dispose of the vacuum bag immediately!), and wash all fabrics in hot, soapy water. Steam cleaning and applying chemical treatments may also work as long as they do not end up poisoning your pet.

Thoroughly sanitise the areas your cat frequently stays in. Try these methods to make sure there are no fleas present in your home: 

Light trap method: In a small bowl, mix equal parts water and dishwashing soap. Place this mixture under a nightlight in the evening. Adult fleas are attracted to light, so they might try to jump toward the light and fall into the bowl. 

White socks method: Walk around the areas your cat regularly hangs out in while sporting white socks. Check the soles if you have accumulated fleas or flea dirt. 

Aside from these techniques, mow your backyard, regularly trim your hedges and bushes, and remove garden debris where fleas could hide out. 

In conclusion

With this article, you are now armed with everything you need to know about fleas. Protect your pet cat and prevent flea infestations from happening by regularly checking your cat’s fur and surroundings, especially if she recently spent time in her catio or your backyard. Always check with your veterinarian before applying or giving anti-flea treatments to your cat. For more informative cat-centric reads, visit our blog!

How to Deal with Cat Eye Problems

Cats have beautiful, haunting eyes that allow them to clearly see in the dark. But when your cat’s eyes appear red, swollen, or something gooey is keeping them shut, there is definitely something wrong. More importantly, something must be done to help your cat because the eye problem may lead to irreparable consequences.  As a Read More...

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Cats have beautiful, haunting eyes that allow them to clearly see in the dark. But when your cat’s eyes appear red, swollen, or something gooey is keeping them shut, there is definitely something wrong. More importantly, something must be done to help your cat because the eye problem may lead to irreparable consequences

As a reminder: This post aims to educate pet owners on the possible causes of cat eye infections, but it is not meant to replace a much-needed visit to the veterinarian. As a responsible cat parent, you should always consult with your vet before doing anything to treat your cat. 

If you’re not sure whether your cat’s eyes are irritated, this article discusses:

Signs of a Cat Eye Infection

No matter how hard you try to keep your cat clean and healthy, she may get an eye-related illness one way or another. PetHelpful lists the common signs of a cat eye infection:

  • Clear, green, yellow, or brown eye discharge
  • Clear, green, yellow, or brown nasal discharge
  • Crusting or pus collected near the tear ducts
  • Dry eyes or excessive tear drop production 
  • Eye eruption and herpes-like lesions
  • Fever
  • Inflammation of the eye or the third eyelid
  • Lethargy, inappetence, and weight loss
  • Red mucous membranes
  • Rubbing, itching, winking, and squinting
  • Sneezing

Aside from these aforementioned symptoms, your cat may also be blinking a lot and pawing her eyes against objects such as your furniture, rug, and carpet.

Possible Causes of Your Cat’s Eye Infection

There are many reasons why your cat has picked up an eye infection. It can be something as simple as foreign objects irritating her eye to something more serious such as bacteria or virus infecting her body. Some common illnesses related to cat eye infections include:

  • Conjunctivitis – Also known as pink eye, this is an inflammation of the light pink lining around your cat’s eye. It is caused by viruses or bacteria.
  • Corneal ulcer – Also called ulcerative keratitis, this painful condition happens when the deepest layers of your cat’s cornea are damaged or lost. Cats with scratches to the cornea are prone to developing eye problems from viruses and bacteria.
  • External objects – Splints, grass seeds, dust particles, and mold are just some examples of irritants that can cause your cat to rub her eyes.
  • Feline Upper Respiratory Infection (URI) – This contamination is caused by viruses such as feline calicivirus, pneumonitis or rhinotracheitis (herpesvirus), bacteria, and protozoa. 
  • Uveitis – An inflammation of the internal structures of your cat’s eyes, uveitis may be caused by cancer, immune problems, infections, or trauma.

Other factors/diseases such as allergens, autoimmune disease, cancer, cherry eye, injury, systemic viral infections, or feline immunodeficiency virus may also cause cat eye problems. It is also possible for cats experiencing stress or ones who have been exposed to infected cats to get eye illnesses. For healthy cats living in stable environments, an unexpected eye infection may indicate a more serious, underlying disease at play. 

Dos and Don’ts of Cat Eye Cleaning

Though it may be tempting to go online and research home remedies that you could make to treat your cat’s swollen eyes, doing so might cause permanent damage to her vision. Worse, the wrong ingredients (apple cider vinegar, colloidal silver, and manuka honey, to name a few) might make her lose her eyesight completely. As such, it is highly recommended that you schedule an appointment with your vet if you notice your cat’s eye problem manifesting for more than 24 hours. Similarly, talk to your vet if you notice your cat squinting or having difficulty seeing. Do not use medicine from your cat’s previous eye problem or over-the-counter eye drops and washes until the vet has checked your cat.  

Once the vet has diagnosed your cat and given you instructions on how to properly attend to her, help keep your cat’s eyes as clean as possible. Remove the gunk from her eyes by following this step-by-step guide:

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly.
  2. Wrap your cat in a blanket or towel to keep her head supported and her body secure. 
  3. Wet a few pieces of cotton balls in lukewarm distilled water. Do not use tap water.
  4. Squeeze out excess water from the cotton ball.
  5. Place the cotton ball over her eye without pressing or applying pressure.
  6. Gently wipe the cotton ball following the direction of your cat’s fur, from the tear duct to the outer eye.
  7. Use a fresh cotton ball for each eye to avoid spreading infection.
  8. When applying vet-approved medication, start with your cat’s good eye before applying medicine on the infected eye.
  9. Repeat the process as needed.

How to Prevent Future Cat Eye Infections

Avoid eye problems from developing by regularly checking your cat’s eyes for a change in colour or shape, cloudiness, discharge, redness, or sensitivity to light. Assist your cat by gently removing the discharge in her eyes and brushing her fur regularly. Feed her with nutrient-rich meals and snacks (check our list of cat-friendly human food!) and keep her environment stress-free. Vaccinate young cats and keep up with yearly vaccinations to prevent infection. It is also advisable to avoid kitty overcrowding, since they are more prone to getting bacteria and viruses from other infected cats.

Read up on other cat-related guides on our blog. From making your backyard pet-friendly to preventing your cat from sleeping in your bed, we’ve got all the resources you need to be the purr-fect parent!  

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