Tag: hair care

Is Bed Head Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Bed Head is not cruelty free. The long answer: Bed Head is a hair care brand distributed by TIGI. Its products are manufactured with the goal of enhancing the hair cut, colour, style, and finish of its users. These products are used by professional hairdressers and sold through salons and select Read More...

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The short answer: No, Bed Head is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Bed Head is a hair care brand distributed by TIGI. Its products are manufactured with the goal of enhancing the hair cut, colour, style, and finish of its users. These products are used by professional hairdressers and sold through salons and select distributors. 

In 2009, Bed Head was acquired by Unilever, a global multinational company known for selling and distributing its products in China. A quick search on its UK website shows that Bed Head doesn’t seem to sell its products in China. However, their official animal testing policy posted on Cruelty Free Kitty states, “We do not test our products on animals and are committed to ending animal testing. Unilever has complied with the EU animal testing bans for cosmetics since 2004 and supports calls for similar bans to be introduced globally. Occasionally, across our portfolio, some of the ingredients we use have to be tested by our suppliers to comply with legal and regulatory requirements in some markets; and some governments test certain products on animals as part of their regulations.”

The last sentence confirms that Bed Head must comply with a country’s laws to be able to sell their products there. With this in mind, Bed Head cannot be considered 100% cruelty free.

References:

TIGI

CFK: Bed Head

Brands to Avoid (Brands That Are Not Cruelty-Free)

Why Unilever is NOT a Cruelty-Free Corporation!

Is Nexxus Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Nexxus is not cruelty free. The long answer: Nexxus is a hair care brand that was founded in 1979. It aims to develop salon knowledge with scientific techniques to create products for specific hair textures, hair styles, and levels of hair damage. Originally bought out by the Alberto-Culver company, Nexxus was Read More...

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The short answer: No, Nexxus is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Nexxus is a hair care brand that was founded in 1979. It aims to develop salon knowledge with scientific techniques to create products for specific hair textures, hair styles, and levels of hair damage. Originally bought out by the Alberto-Culver company, Nexxus was later on purchased by Unilever

On their official US website, Nexxus states: “We do not test our products on animals and are committed to ending animal testing. Unilever has complied with the EU animal testing bans for cosmetics since 2004 and supports calls for similar bans to be introduced globally.

Since the 1980s, Unilever has remained at the forefront of research into non-animal approaches to assess product safety, and we advocate effective, science-based regulation on alternatives to animal testing that ensures consumer safety and facilitates innovation.”

However, research has confirmed that Nexxus is being sold in China. This means that the hair care brand has agreed to follow Chinese importation laws, which include testing its products on animals before and possibly after it is released in the market. Until Nexxus stops selling its products in China or the country changes their laws on animal testing, Nexxus cannot be considered a cruelty-free brand.   

References:

Unilever: Nexxus

FAQs

CFK: Nexxus

Is Nexxus Cruelty-Free and Vegan?

Is Kérastase Cruelty Free?

The short answer:  No, Kérastase is not cruelty free. The long answer: A part of the L’Oréal Professional Products Division, Kérastase is a French luxury hair care line that was founded in 1964. Its products are primarily sold at luxury salons and through its official website. On its US site, Kérastase reveals, “We are happy Read More...

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The short answer:  No, Kérastase is not cruelty free.

The long answer: A part of the L’Oréal Professional Products Division, Kérastase is a French luxury hair care line that was founded in 1964. Its products are primarily sold at luxury salons and through its official website. On its US site, Kérastase reveals, “We are happy to confirm that the L’Oréal group of companies, which includes Lancôme, Redken, Garnier, Ralph Lauren, Giorgio Armani, Biotherm, Kérastase, and Vichy, as well as L’Oréal, has carried out no animal testing since 1989 on the entire range of its products. This decision was undertaken within the framework of our fundamental objectives: to offer innovative products of high quality while ensuring their safety in use by our customers. For information about the significant efforts deployed by our laboratories over a period of 25 years to develop alternative methods to animal testing, as well as our very important achievements in this field, please consult our website at http://www.lorealusa.com.”

Despite the brand’s claims, it is important to know that Kérastase is being sold in mainland China. This country is known for requiring imported hair care products to be tested on animals before being distributed throughout the country. Authorised third parties or health officials may also do random tests on Kérastase products that are already available in the market. With this knowledge, Kérastase cannot claim to be 100% cruelty free. 

References:

FAQs

Beauty Without Bunnies: Kerastase

Wikipedia: Kerastase

CFK: Kerastase

Is Kerastase Cruelty-Free?

Is Biolage Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Biolage is not cruelty free. The long answer: Biolage is a brand that uses botanical ingredients to create professional hair care and hair styling products. It was developed by the hair styling duo, Arnie and Sydell Miller, who founded Matrix. Ten years after Matrix was born, Biolage was introduced in the Read More...

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The short answer: No, Biolage is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Biolage is a brand that uses botanical ingredients to create professional hair care and hair styling products. It was developed by the hair styling duo, Arnie and Sydell Miller, who founded Matrix. Ten years after Matrix was born, Biolage was introduced in the American market. 

Currently owned by French personal care company L’Oréal, Biolage does not reveal its viewpoint on animal testing on its official website. Similarly, it also does not indicate whether its raw materials are tested on animals. At present, multiple sources indicate that the brand is available in China. This implies that before being sold in the market, their products must be tested on animals to ensure safety. Chinese laws also allow health officials to do random animal testing, even after the products have already hit the shelves. Because of these reasons, Biolage cannot be considered cruelty free.

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Matrix

Biolage: About Us

Is Matrix Cruelty-Free in 2020?

CFK: Matrix

Is Wella Professionals Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Wella Professionals is not cruelty free. The long answer: Short for Wella, Wella Professionals is a German hair care company that was created by Franz Ströher in 1880. The company specializes in manufacturing hair care, hair styling, and hair colouring products for personal and professional use. In 2015, Wella was sold Read More...

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The short answer: No, Wella Professionals is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Short for Wella, Wella Professionals is a German hair care company that was created by Franz Ströher in 1880. The company specializes in manufacturing hair care, hair styling, and hair colouring products for personal and professional use. In 2015, Wella was sold by Procter & Gamble to Coty, Inc. Alongside Wella, the multinational beauty company also develops and distributes Max Factor and CoverGirl (a cruelty-free brand!). 

Wella does not disclose its animal testing stance on its official website. However, various sources have revealed that its products are available in China. Ethical Elephant has posted a correspondence with Wella, in which the company states, “We do not perform, nor do we ever commission any third parties on our behalf to perform, testing of our products or ingredients on animals, except where required by law.” They also added, “It is common knowledge that China requires mandatory animal tests on all cosmetic products imported into the country. We continue to be involved in the dialogue with the Chinese authorities, including through our active membership of the China Association of Fragrance Flavor and Cosmetic Industries (CAFFCI), to replace animal tests with alternatives.”

Until China changes its laws on animal testing or Wella discontinues selling its products in said country, the hair care company cannot claim to be cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Wella

Wella Professionals

Wikipedia: Wella

Is Wella Cruelty-Free? (What You Need To Know Before You Buy!)

Is Head & Shoulders Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Head & Shoulders is not cruelty free. The long answer: Head & Shoulders is an anti-dandruff shampoo that was developed in 1961. It was originally created as a cream by a team working under chemical engineer and bacteriologist, John Parran Jr. Fourteen years later, they transformed it into a clinically proven Read More...

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The short answer: No, Head & Shoulders is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Head & Shoulders is an anti-dandruff shampoo that was developed in 1961. It was originally created as a cream by a team working under chemical engineer and bacteriologist, John Parran Jr. Fourteen years later, they transformed it into a clinically proven dandruff-fighting shampoo. At present, Head & Shoulders not only sells anti-dandruff shampoo and conditioner, but also hair styling products.

Head & Shoulders is owned by American multinational consumer goods corporation Procter & Gamble (P&G), which also distributes Herbal Essences, Aussie, and Pantene. On its website, it states, “As part of the Procter & Gamble family, Head & Shoulders adheres to the same standards of safety as regulatory bodies around the world.” This hair care line is one of the P&G brands that is being sold in mainland China. As such, it needs to follow the country’s importation laws—one of which is to undergo product testing on animals before they can be sold across the country. Chinese health authorities can also choose to retest the products on animals if a customer files a complaint, or simply to do a random check. Because of these reasons, Head & Shoulders cannot be considered a cruelty-free brand.  

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Head & Shoulders

Head & Shoulders

CFK: Head & Shoulders

Is Matrix Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Matrix is not cruelty free. The long answer: Previously known as Matrix Essentials, Matrix was founded in 1980 by an American hair styling team/husband and wife, Arnie and Sydell Miller. Matrix is known for selling hair care, hair colour, hair styling, and texture creating products for professional hair stylists. It has Read More...

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The short answer: No, Matrix is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Previously known as Matrix Essentials, Matrix was founded in 1980 by an American hair styling team/husband and wife, Arnie and Sydell Miller. Matrix is known for selling hair care, hair colour, hair styling, and texture creating products for professional hair stylists. It has been owned by French personal care company L’Oréal since 2000. 

Matrix does not discuss its position regarding animal testing on its official website. However, various sites have confirmed that they sell their products in China. It is a known fact that imported beauty products must undergo compulsory animal testing before entering this particular country. Chinese health officials or authorised third parties administer tests using animals to make sure imported products are safe for human use. Unless they pull out their products in China, Matrix cannot be considered cruelty free.

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Matrix

Wikipedia: L’Oréal

Matrix

Is Matrix Cruelty-Free in 2020?

CFK: Matrix

Is Schwarzkopf Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Schwarzkopf is not entirely cruelty free. The long answer: Schwarzkopf is a German brand that sells hair care, hair styling, and hair colouring products across the globe. It is owned by the multinational company Henkel, which has shared their commitment against animal testing. The company declares:  “We do not test our Read More...

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The short answer: No, Schwarzkopf is not entirely cruelty free.

The long answer: Schwarzkopf is a German brand that sells hair care, hair styling, and hair colouring products across the globe. It is owned by the multinational company Henkel, which has shared their commitment against animal testing. The company declares

“We do not test our cosmetic products on animals. This applies to both the products for home use available in the market and professional products used in hair salons.

We have not carried out any tests on animals for our cosmetic products since the late 1980s, around 15 years before a respective EU ban came into effect in 2004. What is more, since March 2013, no cosmetic ingredient may be tested on animals in the EU. Naturally, we comply with this obligation.”

Henkel currently sells Schwarzkopf products in China. The company addressed the matter by saying, “China still tests certain cosmetic products from our assortment on animals to obtain market registration. We are working with national and European associations to convince the authorities in China to cease testing cosmetic products on animals. We are fortunately starting to see signs of acceptance of alternative methods. For example, the Chinese authorities are allowing a simplified registration procedure without animal testing for locally manufactured cosmetic products, such as shampoos or shower gels. This change has already helped our locally produced products and we welcome it greatly, seeing it as confirmation of our efforts.”

China is known for doing pre- and post-distribution tests on animals. Though Schwarzkopf has eliminated the need for testing locally produced items, authorised third parties are still allowed to randomly conduct tests on their products. They can also do tests if there are customer complaints. Until Schwarzkopf stops selling in China or China stops testing on animals, Schwarzkopf cannot be considered completely cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Schwarzkopf

Our Commitment: No animal testing for our cosmetic products

Is Schwarzkopf Cruelty-Free and Vegan?

Is Suave Cruelty Free?

The short answer: Yes, Suave is cruelty free. The long answer: Suave is a natural hair care line that was formed in 1937 by National Mineral Company. It originally sold hair tonic, then expanded into other hair care as well as body care products. In 1996, it was acquired by Unilever, a global multinational company Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, Suave is cruelty free.

The long answer: Suave is a natural hair care line that was formed in 1937 by National Mineral Company. It originally sold hair tonic, then expanded into other hair care as well as body care products. In 1996, it was acquired by Unilever, a global multinational company that also manufactures Pond’s and St. Ives (a cruelty-free brand!).

On its US website, Suave announced that it is proud to be certified cruelty-free by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). The brand states, “Our Suave policy prohibits all animal tests, anywhere in the world. Over 30 years ago, our parent company Unilever started to use non-animal testing methods to assess the safety of its products and ingredients. Unilever’s ongoing work on alternatives to animal testing, and its commitment to promote their adoption globally, has also been recognized by PETA who has listed Unilever as a ‘company working for regulatory change.’”

Additionally, Ethical Pixie reports that Suave is not being sold in mainland China. Aside from this, it also reports that the suppliers of Suave’s raw ingredients and other third parties are not allowed to test on animals on their behalf. As such, Suave can be considered a cruelty-free brand.

To buy Suave products, visit their official website

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Suave

Suave: Certified Cruelty-Free by PETA

Is Suave Cruelty-Free?

Is Bumble and bumble Cruelty Free?

The short answer: Yes, Bumble and bumble is cruelty free. The long answer: Bumble and bumble is a hair care brand that is considered cruelty free because of its PETA certification and the fact that it does not sell its products in China. It began as a hair salon in 1977 by Michael Gordon, a Read More...

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The short answer: Yes, Bumble and bumble is cruelty free.

The long answer: Bumble and bumble is a hair care brand that is considered cruelty free because of its PETA certification and the fact that it does not sell its products in China. It began as a hair salon in 1977 by Michael Gordon, a hairdresser and entrepreneur. On its UK website, the hair care brand discusses its stance on animal testing, saying: 

“Bumble and bumble, LLC. is committed to the elimination of animal testing. We are equally committed to consumer health and safety, and bringing to market products that comply with applicable regulations in every country in which our products are sold.

We do not conduct animal testing on our products or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except when required by law. We evaluate our finished products in clinical tests on volunteer panels.

Bumble and bumble, LLC. fully supports the development and global acceptance of non-animal testing alternatives. To this end, the Company works extensively with the industry at large and the global scientific community to research and fund these alternatives.”

However, it is important to note that Bumble and bumble has been owned by Estée Lauder Companies since 2006. The company is known for selling particular brands in China, such as Estée Lauder and Bobbi Brown Cosmetics. On its website, Estée Lauder Companies states: “The Estée Lauder Companies is a global company with 25+ brands, sold in 150 countries and territories. While most regulatory bodies accept non-animal data to demonstrate safety in cosmetics, some regulatory bodies require the testing of our products or ingredients on animals to demonstrate cosmetics safety. In such cases, we take all practical and available steps to encourage the acceptance of existing non-animal test data instead.”

To purchase cruelty-free Bumble and bumble hair products, visit their website

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Bumble and Bumble

Customer Service

Animal Testing

Is Bumble and Bumble Cruelty-Free in 2020?

CFK: Bumble and Bumble

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