Tag: procter & gamble

Is Crest Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Crest is not cruelty free. The long answer: Created by the American multinational corporation Procter & Gamble, Crest is a brand that sells oral hygiene products. It began selling toothpaste with the name Fluoristan back in 1954, and soon expanded its brand to make and distribute toothbrush, mouthwash, dental floss, and Read More...

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The short answer: No, Crest is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Created by the American multinational corporation Procter & Gamble, Crest is a brand that sells oral hygiene products. It began selling toothpaste with the name Fluoristan back in 1954, and soon expanded its brand to make and distribute toothbrush, mouthwash, dental floss, and tooth whitening strips. 

There is no mention of animal testing on Crest’s official US website. On the P&G website, Crest’s parent company states that they have “invested in non-animal test method development for decades, and is also a founding sponsor and has been a leading presenter at every World Congress on non-animal test methods to date—involving thousands of scientists, regulators, and policy makers. We continue to partner with leading international animal welfare organizations, academia, industry coalitions, and policy makers to promote alternatives to animal testing and gain their regulatory acceptance. Together, we have achieved a lot. We stopped animal testing our cosmetics products many years ago. In fact, P&G no longer animal tests any consumer product unless required by law and we are committed to make animal testing obsolete.”

The phrase “unless required by law” is concerning because it means the company has to comply with a country’s rules and regulations before their products can be sold there. This pertains to China, where Crest and other P&G brands (such as Head & Shoulders, Olay, and Pantene) are being sold. This is a country known for conducting tests on animals before and possibly after a product gets released in the market. With these facts, Crest cannot be considered 100% cruelty free. 

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Crest

Cruelty Free Kitty: Crest

Is Crest Cruelty-Free in 2020?

Be Cruelty Free

Is Old Spice Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Old Spice is not cruelty free. The long answer: Old Spice is an American brand that has been selling male grooming products as early as 1937. It is known for its deodorants and antiperspirants, but has expanded its range to sell grooming products such as shampoos, body washes, and soaps. It Read More...

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The short answer: No, Old Spice is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Old Spice is an American brand that has been selling male grooming products as early as 1937. It is known for its deodorants and antiperspirants, but has expanded its range to sell grooming products such as shampoos, body washes, and soaps. It was originally owned by Shulton Company, which was founded by William Lightfoot Schultz. In 1990, ownership was transferred to American multinational consumer goods corporation, Procter & Gamble.

Old Spice’s official website does not contain detailed information about their position on animal testing. However, its parent company reveals on its website: “P&G has invested in non-animal test method development for decades, and is also a founding sponsor and has been a leading presenter at every World Congress on non-animal test methods to date- involving thousands of scientists, regulators, and policy makers. We continue to partner with leading international animal welfare organizations, academia, industry coalitions and policy makers to promote alternatives to animal testing and gain their regulatory acceptance. Together, we have achieved a lot. We stopped animal testing our cosmetics products many years ago. In fact, P&G no longer animal tests any consumer product unless required by law and we are committed to make animal testing obsolete.”

At present, Old Spice products are available in mainland China. This particular country requires all imported grooming products to be tested on animals, which are conducted by health officials or authorised third parties. Old Spice and P&G need to comply with Chinese mandatory regulations to be able to sell its products in the country. Therefore, the men’s grooming brand cannot be considered completely cruelty free.  

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Old Spice

CFK: Old Spice

Is Old Spice Cruelty-Free in 2020?

Our Commitment to Be Cruelty Free

Is Head & Shoulders Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Head & Shoulders is not cruelty free. The long answer: Head & Shoulders is an anti-dandruff shampoo that was developed in 1961. It was originally created as a cream by a team working under chemical engineer and bacteriologist, John Parran Jr. Fourteen years later, they transformed it into a clinically proven Read More...

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The short answer: No, Head & Shoulders is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Head & Shoulders is an anti-dandruff shampoo that was developed in 1961. It was originally created as a cream by a team working under chemical engineer and bacteriologist, John Parran Jr. Fourteen years later, they transformed it into a clinically proven dandruff-fighting shampoo. At present, Head & Shoulders not only sells anti-dandruff shampoo and conditioner, but also hair styling products.

Head & Shoulders is owned by American multinational consumer goods corporation Procter & Gamble (P&G), which also distributes Herbal Essences, Aussie, and Pantene. On its website, it states, “As part of the Procter & Gamble family, Head & Shoulders adheres to the same standards of safety as regulatory bodies around the world.” This hair care line is one of the P&G brands that is being sold in mainland China. As such, it needs to follow the country’s importation laws—one of which is to undergo product testing on animals before they can be sold across the country. Chinese health authorities can also choose to retest the products on animals if a customer files a complaint, or simply to do a random check. Because of these reasons, Head & Shoulders cannot be considered a cruelty-free brand.  

References:

Beauty Without Bunnies: Head & Shoulders

Head & Shoulders

CFK: Head & Shoulders

Is Herbal Essences Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Herbal Essences is not cruelty free. The long answer: Herbal Essences is a line of hair care products by Procter & Gamble—a company that also distributes Aussie and Pantene. It is endorsed by PETA as a cruelty-free brand. The brand shares, “Cruelty free means that our products and ingredients will not Read More...

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The short answer: No, Herbal Essences is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Herbal Essences is a line of hair care products by Procter & Gamble—a company that also distributes Aussie and Pantene. It is endorsed by PETA as a cruelty-free brand. The brand shares, “Cruelty free means that our products and ingredients will not be tested on animals. Herbal Essences is proud and excited to be recognized by PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, as a cruelty free brand.”

Despite the recognition from PETA, Herbal Essences sells its hair care products in China. China is known for having mandatory laws that require imported beauty products to undergo animal testing before being released in the country. Animal tests can also be done when a customer complains about a certain hair product. Until China changes its import policies or Herbal Essences stops selling in China, it cannot claim to be 100% cruelty free.  

References:

Herbal Essences: PETA cruelty free brand

Beauty Without Bunnies: Herbal Essences

Leaping Bunny Approved Brands 

Is Aussie Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Aussie is not entirely cruelty free. The long answer: Aussie is an international cosmetics brand focused on selling hair care products such as shampoos, conditioners, hair serums, gels, and sprays. Its parent company is Procter & Gamble, an American multinational consumer goods corporation that also sells Olay. On their website, Aussie Read More...

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The short answer: No, Aussie is not entirely cruelty free.

The long answer: Aussie is an international cosmetics brand focused on selling hair care products such as shampoos, conditioners, hair serums, gels, and sprays. Its parent company is Procter & Gamble, an American multinational consumer goods corporation that also sells Olay.

On their website, Aussie proudly states that they are cruelty free. The brand shares, “Yes, Aussie is recognized cruelty free by PETA! Koalas, wombats and kangaroos, quokkas, bilbies and quolls… whether you’ve heard of them or not, our Australian natives, big and small, are our friends. All of them! That’s why, at Aussie, we’re against animal testing.” Aussie adds, “Rest assured, you can be kind to kangaroos (and all our other furry friends) while having perfect, bouncy hair too.”

Despite their cruelty-free claims, websites such as Vegan Beauty Girl and Cruelty Free Kitty argue that because Aussie is sold in China, it cannot claim to be 100% cruelty free. China has mandatory testing laws for imported cosmetic products. Though Aussie is said to be selling domestically manufactured products in China, there is still a risk of post-market testing conducted by third parties on behalf of the Chinese government. Therefore, Aussie cannot claim to be completely cruelty free. 

References:

Is Aussie Cruelty Free?

Is Aussie Vegan or Cruelty Free?

Cruelty Free Kitty: Aussie

Beauty Without Bunnies

Leaping Bunny Approved Brands

Is Pantene Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Pantene is not cruelty free. The long answer: Owned by multinational consumer goods corporation Procter & Gamble, Pantene is known for its hair care products such as shampoos, conditioners, styling products, and hair treatments. First introduced in 1945 by Hoffmann-La Roche, the name is based on its shampoo ingredient, panthenol—more commonly Read More...

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The short answer: No, Pantene is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Owned by multinational consumer goods corporation Procter & Gamble, Pantene is known for its hair care products such as shampoos, conditioners, styling products, and hair treatments. First introduced in 1945 by Hoffmann-La Roche, the name is based on its shampoo ingredient, panthenol—more commonly known as pro-vitamin B5.

Similar to Procter & Gamble’s Olay, Pantene is being sold globally. This includes China, where mandatory testing laws are in place for imported beauty products. Pantene states, “A number of countries still require animal testing by law to ensure the safety or effectiveness of certain products and ingredients. At P&G we believe that the majority of animal testing by these authorities are scientifically unnecessary.”

The brand elaborates, “We have invested more than $410 million in developing alternative, non-animal testing methods, although not all global regulators and authorities accept them. Where no alternative tests exist we are continuing to develop non-animal testing methods and work with regulatory agencies around the world on their acceptance to eliminate animal testing completely.”

Though their efforts towards a cruelty-free world is acknowledged and appreciated, the fact remains that Pantene needs to comply with China’s mandatory animal tests to be able to be sold in that country. Therefore, the brand cannot claim to be cruelty free. 

References:

Pantene: Contact Us

Beauty Without Bunnies

Leaping Bunny Approved Brands

Is Pantene Cruelty Free?

Is Olay Cruelty Free?

The short answer: No, Olay is not cruelty free. The long answer: Olay is a skin care brand introduced in the market in 1952 by Adams National Industries. In 1985, it was acquired by the American multinational consumer goods corporation, Procter & Gamble. Originally selling a moisturiser called Oil of Olay, the brand soon expanded Read More...

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The short answer: No, Olay is not cruelty free.

The long answer: Olay is a skin care brand introduced in the market in 1952 by Adams National Industries. In 1985, it was acquired by the American multinational consumer goods corporation, Procter & Gamble. Originally selling a moisturiser called Oil of Olay, the brand soon expanded into selling a full range of hypoallergenic variants, cleansers, creams, soap, and body wash. 

On its official website, Olay is “calling for an end to animal testing in skin care and the beauty industry.” It elaborates by saying, “We do not test our products on animals. Olay is working closely with governments around the world to provide alternative research methods to eliminate testing on animals, enabling cruelty-free skin care in the beauty industry.” 

The brand elaborates, “For example, in a few countries where Olay is sold, governments still mandate animal tests. In those cases, Olay can be required by law to submit our products to labs where we know animal tests are happening. This is why we do not claim cruelty-free on our packaging. We do not believe these tests are necessary to evaluate safety or performance. But today, they won’t accept alternative non-animal testing methods. We remain steadfast and will continue to advocate for alternative methods to end animal tests in the industry.”

Despite investing heavily in animal testing alternatives (P&G has devoted a total of $410 million to for cruelty-free research and development), the fact remains that Olay is still being sold in China—a country that requires imported cosmetics to be tested on animals. Furthermore, both PETA and Leaping Bunnies do not include Olay on their cruelty-free lists. 

References:

Is Olay Skin Care Cruelty Free?

Beauty Without Bunnies: Olay (Procter & Gamble)

Leaping Bunny Approved Brands 

Is Olay Vegan or Cruelty-Free? (2020)

Wikipedia: Olay

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